Inuit Outreach Project

South and North working together and learning together.

Reaching out to the people of Halton Hills and Beyond

OUR MISSION

To enable Inuit to live with dignity through:

• Outreach, providing essential items to offset the high cost of living.

• Social Justice through information sharing and relationship-building.

We would like to acknowledge that we meet on the traditional territories of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), Ojibway/Chippewa, Anishinabek First Nations.

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To learn which First Nations people inhabited the place where you live, work, study, pray...visit: native-land.ca

The Spark

A few weeks before Christmas in 2010, Connie Karlsson from Norval, Ontario received a phone call that would change the way she and hundreds of others in surrounding communities knew and understood the lives of Inuit living in and connected to remote communities of Nunavik (northern Quebec) and Nunavut.

Karlsson had participated in in a holiday campaign suggested by a coworker a year earlier: why not collect and send things to Inukjuak, a community of about 1,600 souls located in Hudson Bay. This co-worker had been inspired by the story of Daghny Langer, the relative of a relative’s, who she knew had at one time lived in Montreal and fostered many Inuit children with ties to Inukjuak.

In fact, Dagny Langer had over the course 30 years fostered over 300 Inuk children, in particular, the children that were sick and had been medi-evacked from Inukjuak to Montreal. Dagny went on to adopt three of these children.

In the phone call, a message from Dagny simply said: “The little ones, are in desperate need of baby and children’s clothes and other essentials like baby formula, teething biscuits, baby diapers, baby wipes, baby powder, and hand soap,” she said.

Karlsson decided that in this second drive, she would ask the minister, Rev. Margaret Murray, at her small church to share the request at two other small churches that were part of Murray’s three point parish.

That clothing drive, which procured a 400 pound shipment packed into 30 boxes by a dozen volunteers has since grown into a twice annual shipment fetching more than 12 tons (300+ boxes) of items which are distributed to individuals living in 14 Northern Communities.

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Collecting of Essential Items

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Truck Loading Day - Spring Shipment - May 14, 2016

The Iqualuit load went separately, but on this truck...

  • 143 boxes
  • 1833 kg loaded aboard
  • 24 volunteers on hand, smiling at a job well done!
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And on another truck headed to Ottawa...

  • 60 boxes
  • 498 kg

Phew! That was a lot of packing in a 6 week campaign!

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Previous Shipment to Montreal - December 5, 2015

  • Saturday, December 5, 2015 at 8AM to load the Christmas Shipment of 3,542.53 LBs (142 boxes).
  • Previous Shipment - Spring 2015 - 192 boxes
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In a message from Mina Experon (one of our northern contacts) we learned...

The spring shipment of 26 boxes arrived to the communities of Umiujaq (Inuit reserved land) Sanikiluaq and Kuujjuarapi.

Nakurmiik to Mina Experon and her helpers for distributing the donations. Nakurmiik to Sharp Transportation, Pete Adema, Air Inuit, St. Paul's, St. Stephens, and St John's Anglican churches and the many volunteers in the community of Halton Hills and beyond for all that you do!

Pictured below are the drop off location for Iqualuit and Umiujaq. Both shipments from the April/ May packing party arrived just before the end of June.

Typical packing campaign means the work of Lots of Volunteers!

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Our Mission is Sparking Something in Others...

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Partners

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Shipping and Flying

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Every time we hold events and prepare shipments, we have been able to make new connections. Our most recent is Friends of the North which helps the Artic Bay Food Bank and residents of Canada’s Fly-in only communities have Food Security and sustainable community based programs.
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What we collect:

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Collecting & Donating - Beyond Our Cluster

St. George's Anglican - St. Catherine's

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Aboriginal Youth Club Centre Wellington District High School

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Bethel United Church, Acton

Bethel Inuit Pack and Sort June 2014

Soccer Equipment -

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Food in the North

Living off the Land No More

Changes in climate and settlement by more people from the south has changed the way Inuit people live and provide for one of the most basic needs - food.

Sure, they can ship food and other essentials from the south, but at what cost? Literally, how much do you think it costs for a few basic items?

Take a guess how much these items cost in Iqualuit?


  • Peanut Butter
  • Toilet Paper
  • A Bag of Sugar
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How we have helped...

Inclusion Café
Qayuqtuvik Society Iqaluit Soup Kitchen

Emulsifier Purchase & Donation

Connie and Dagny delivered an industrial size emulsifier to Wade Thorhaug, President of the Qayuqtuvik Soup Kitchen which runs seven days a week -- lunch and supper -- serving an average of 60 people a day.
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$1220.40 spent to purchase industrial restaurant size emulsifier to take to the Iqaluit Soup

Kitchen (see below for feedback), Connie attended the St Jude’s Cathedral, Iqaluit, worked in the Soup Kitchen and presented the emulsifier to the President of the Soup Kitchen Wade Thorhaug

Which resulted in this article in the Niagara Anglican

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Pictures from Inclusion Cafe from Thanksgiving

And this e-mail...

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Spreading the Message

  • Georgetown Optimist Club Presentation - September 9, 2015
  • Silver-wood Women’s Institute Presentation, met Tauni Sheldon, a local Inuk and a subsequent IFP article Kathy Kerr, St. John’s coordinated the invitation to present at their monthly meeting - October 14, 2015
  • Article in the Niagara Diocese Newspaper - October 2015
  • Received through Home Hardware 5 boxes of hand knit hats mitts and scarves from St. George’s Anglican Church, St. Catherine’s via our contact Effie Ida. 500 hats of which Effie’s sister Bernice knitted over 150 toques - November 2, 2015
  • Aboriginal Youth Club donation, Fergus – one truck filled from the communities serving Central Wellington HS - November 7, 2015
  • Article in the CWDHS web page - November 13, 2015

Social Media

Inuit Outreach Facebook Page

263 following -Post Reach – 1031 people
Providing:

 Regular social justice updates

 Cluster Happenings

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News Articles

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Moving Forward

Executive/ Planning Committee

Roles Filled


  • Co--Chairs - Deborah Keefe & Connie Karlsson
  • Secretary - Bonnie Burton
  • Treasurer - Mike Mansfield
  • Media and Social Networking - Anne Rice & Connie Karlsson

Roles to be filled

 Logistics Coordinator

 Public Relations Officer

 Cluster Communications Officers, one from each Church needed

 Inuit Outreach Communications Officer

 Build and maintain web link Caring and Serving as One web page to Inuit Outreach Project and to connect it to all Anglican and United churches

Social Justice through Learning - 3 Events Under Our Belts & more to come in 2016-2017!

Documentary Viewing & Facilitated Discussion

February 6, 2016
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Learning with Tauni Sheldon

March 7, 2016
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Special Guest Presenter - Johnny Issaluk, Athlete - April 2016

"Johnny Issaluk is originally from a small arctic hamlet on the coast of Hudson’s Bay in Nunavut called Igluligaarjuk (known as Chesterfield Inlet). Johnny considers himself most fortunate to have lived his life traditionally, out on the land, hunting, fishing and camping as his elders have for centuries yet juxtaposed with the benefits of advanced education through secondary school and Nunavut Arctic College in tourism, guiding and environmental technology."
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Resulted in front page coverage in The Independent

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Here is a video featuring Johnny Issaluk

Inuit High Kick
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And following a presentation in Acton

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From the Archives

Some other articles from previous shipments...

We sometimes forget how much we have grown in a short time.

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