Agriculture

Roles, Relation To Other topics, and Effects On My Life

Agriculture and Its Role In The Lithosphere

As a human race, we depend on agriculture for our survival. It is essential for us to receive the nutrients we need from this practice.
However, abuse to this practice can potentially cause destruction to the Lithosphere.
There are ways to counter-act this destruction and sustain a better lithosphere through better agricultural practices.

How Agriculture Relates To Other Topics We Have Learned

Erosion

The malpractice of agriculture can lead to soil drifting away by erosion. Barren exposure to the air with little to no vegetation protection leads to erosion, which makes agricultural practices nearly impossible (unless you are trying to grow cacti). In order to maintain fertile soil, it is important for it all to stay in one place.
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Deforestation

Farmers need to make money. In order to make this money, they need more farmland. In order to have more farmland they often burn/cut-down forests. The land eventually becomes completely barren. Deforestation is one of the main causes of climate change in the world.
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How Agriculture Has a Direct Effect On My Life

Obviously, without agriculture I probably would not be able to type this. Humanity would cease to exist without it being our food source. I also look down at my clothing and realize that it is made of cotton, which comes from agricultural practices. I then begin to think about truly how many materials I use everyday that come from agriculture. Agriculture directly impacts our lives in such obvious ways that we tend lack appreciation for its value in our lives.

How Agriculture Has An Indirect Effect On My Life

If agriculture did not exist our industry would not exist. It is the backbone of our imports/exports. We need it to economically thrive in the world. Therefore, through a chain of events, my family could become poor if our economy is struggling. To sum it up, our economy depends on agriculture, and my family's income depends on U.S. economical stature.

By Kristin Brown