Coleman County

Located in Central Texas

Location

Coleman County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 8,895. The county seat is Coleman. The county was founded in 1858 and organized in 1864

County Seat

The county seat of Coleman County is Coleman.

Texas Game Wardens Coleman County

Lee Morrisen and Norman Terry are the Game wardens of Coleman County.

Justice of Peace

Judge William Nance Campbell is the Justice of Peace for Coleman County.

Description of Office:

The justice of the peace presides over the court that is most accessible to the average citizen. Justices of the peace hear misdemeanor cases punishable by fine only and can hear most civil cases in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $10,000.

The justice of the peace also performs the functions of a magistrate and conducts inquests. In addition, a justice of the peace may issue warrants for search and arrest. Justices of the peace also issue civil process, conduct preliminary hearings, administer oaths, perform marriages and serve as a coroner in counties where there is no medical examiner. The justice of the peace may also conduct inquests.

As with all elected county officials, the justice of the peace has ultimate authority over the operations of the office, including the authority to hire and fire personnel and direct their daily activities. The justice of the peace also has authority to determine how to use all other resources allocated to the office during the budget process.

The County Judge of Coleman County

The County Judge of Coleman County is Judge Billy Bledsoe.The Texas Constitution vests broad judicial and administrative powers in the position of county judge, who presides over a five-member commissioners court, which has budgetary and administrative authority over county government operations.


The county judge handles such widely varying matters as hearings for beer and wine license applications, hearing on admittance to state hospitals and juvenile work permits and temporary guardianships for special purposes. The judge is also responsible for calling elections, posting election notices and for receiving and canvassing the election returns. The county judge may perform marriages.


A county judge in Texas may have judicial responsibility for certain criminal, civil and probate matters - responsibility for these functions vary from county to county. In those counties in which the judge has judicial responsibilities, the judge has appellate jurisdiction over matters arising from the justice courts. The county judge is also head of civil defense and disaster relief, county welfare and in counties under 225,000 population, the judge prepares the county budget along with the county auditor or county clerk.

The Treasurer Of Coleman County

Jerri Ann Chambers is the Treasurer of Coleman County.

County Attorney

Joe Lee Rose is the County Attorney for Coleman County.

Description of Office

The main duty of both the county attorney and the district attorney is to represent the state in criminal cases. Both work with law enforcement officers in the investigation and preparation of cases to be heard before the criminal courts.

Typically, the county attorney represents the state in misdemeanor criminal cases and the district attorney represents the state in felony cases. These public prosecutors determine whether prosecution in any given case should be instituted and, if instituted, pushed to a successful conclusion.

Other duties include prosecution of juvenile offenders, representation of victims of violence in protective orders and representing the Texas Department of Protective & Regulatory services in removing children from abusive households

The county attorney typically provides legal advice to the commissioners court and other elected officials. When requested in writing, the county attorney provides written legal counsel to county officials about their duties of office. Absent a specific statutory mandate, however, it is not the duty of the county attorney to represent the county in civil cases.

Some counties do not have both a county attorney and a district attorney. These counties have either a criminal district attorney or a combination county and district attorney. In these counties, one individual performs the functions of both the county attorney and the district attorney.

As with all elected county officials, the county attorney has ultimate authority over the operations of the office, including the authority to hire and fire personnel and direct their daily activities. The county attorney also has authority to determine how to use all other resources allocated to the office during the budget process.