Pathogens on the global scale

SARS & Smallpox

History of Pathogens

Since the beginning of time pathogens have affected millions of people and killed millions more. There have been two main modern pathogens that have affected and killed hundreds of thousands of people. These pathogens are SARS and Smallpox.
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SARS

The SARS virus

SARS or Severe acute respiratory syndrome is a deadly respiratory virus that has caused chaos in global life. During the years 2002 and 2003, an outbreak of SARS in China became a pandemic, with 8,273 cases and 775 deaths worldwide. The U.N. stated this within weeks of the initial outbreak. SARS also spread from Hong Kong to infect individuals in 37 countries including the United States in early 2003. A cure was found.


Smallpox

The Smallpox virus

The small pox virus was a massive epidemic that nearly wiped out entire groups of ethnicities. Smallpox was a deadly pathogen only unique to humans, caused by either of two virus strains, Variola minor and Variola major. The disease was originally known in English as the "red plague" since of its rash causing side affect. The last naturally occurring case of smallpox (Variola minor) was diagnosed on 26 October 1977. The smallpox virus only exists in labs now and a cure is widely available.




Smallpox - The Greatest Battle of Mankind
SARS: The True Story (Documentary)

Other important pathogens

  • Salmonella
  • Yellow Fever Virus
  • The Black Plague
  • Malaria
  • Typhoid
  • Typhus
  • Cholera
  • Spanish plague

Bibliography

  1. ^ a b c d Thiel V, ed. (2007). Coronaviruses: Molecular and Cellular Biology (1st ed.). Caister Academic Press. ISBN [[Special:BookSources/978-1-904455-16-5]|978-1-904455-16-5]]].
  2. ^ "Summary of probable SARS cases with onset of illness from 1 November 2002 to 31 July 2003". World Health Organization (WHO).
  3. ^ "Summary of probable SARS cases with onset of illness from 1 November 2002 to 31 July 2003". World Health Organization (WHO). Retrieved 2008-10-31.
  4. ^ Smith, R. D. (2006). "Responding to global infectious disease outbreaks, Lessons from SARS on the role of risk perception, communication and management". Social Science and Medicine 63 (12): 3113–3123. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.08.004.PMID 16978751.