Operations Facility

Texas A&M University

The Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering

As of 2014, there were 1,283 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the highly prestigious Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University. While the school of petroleum engineering is consistently ranked among the highest programs in the country, there is always room for improvement. Our job bid will provide a very special opportunity for Texas A&M University to excel among other universities. If you would like to see a brief informative video on the background of petroleum engineers, please click the video below.


-Jacob Fisher

CareerBuilder Top Jobs of 2014: Petroleum Engineer

A State of Unbalance

In the petroleum industry, engineers usually go into either the reservoir engineering or operations engineering discipline. Reservoir engineering mostly deals with modeling and mapping out reservoirs, while operations engineering focuses on drilling wells and the production of oil and gas. While the petroleum engineering department at Texas A&M is among the best in the country, it is too heavily focused on the reservoir engineering discipline. Texas A&M University needs an operations facility to enhance student learning. The curriculum for a Bachelor of Science degree in the petroleum engineering department requires 23 hours of reservoir focused classes and only 15 hours of operations focused classes. This uneven distribution of classes puts students who may want to go into the operations discipline of the petroleum industry at a disadvantage. Brad Fisher, an industry board member for the petroleum engineering department and the Chief Operating Officer at Carrizo Oil & Gas supports that, a majority of graduates will start as operations engineers in the petroleum industry. This means that while students are more focused on the reservoir aspects of their studies at Texas A&M, there is a better chance they will end up in operations. More in depth information about the current curriculum and facts about the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering can be found in the link below. https://engineering.tamu.edu/petroleum/academics/degrees/undergraduate/bs


-Jacob Fisher

Big image

Something is Missing

Texas A&M University is lacking adequate hands on learning for the operations discipline of the petroleum engineering department. The unbalanced curriculum previously mentioned and the inadequacy of opportunities for students to interact with operations equipment is ultimately putting students at a disadvantage. While there are labs that accompany the operations courses at Texas A&M with limited operations equipment and simulators, some equipment simply cannot be fit into a classroom. Supporting material from the online article, "Hands on Learning vs. Lecturing", by Katie Ash, a writer for Education Week, shows that in a study, students are more engaged and comprehensive of the material presented with a hands on learning approach. The only step the petroleum department has taken to combat this issue is, requiring students to have an internship before they graduate, hoping they will get exposure to real world aspects of the petroleum industry. Unfortunately, internships are few and far in-between with low oil prices, and having an internship doesn't guarantee hands on learning with operations facilities. As a graduate with a degree in petroleum engineering from Texas A&M University, I can attest to having difficulty understanding abstract material without hands on learning opportunities. With very complex courses, it was not uncommon to see my fellow classmates disengage because they had nothing more than lecture slides to learn from. The article, "Case for Hands-On Learning", published by Resource Area for Teaching, a non-profit promoter of education, upholds that hands on activities can make students more engaged and connect abstract concepts to the real world. Needless to say abstract concepts are a regular occurrence for student to encounter. More benefits about hands on learning and the referenced articles can be found in the links below.

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2009/01/engaging_students_in_stem.html

http://www.raft.net/case-for-hands-on-learning

Additional material:

http://news.everest.edu/post/2010/01/top-5-benefits-of-a-hands-on-learning-environment/#.VmURr86Gnww


-Jacob Fisher

Big image

What's at Stake

The goal of any college is to get the student ready for real world experience. For this to hold true, students must understand theoretical and physical aspects of the petroleum industry. The Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering's vision states, “That ‘I am an Aggie Petroleum Engineer’ be the most respected, prestigious self-definition within the petroleum engineering profession”. With a reputation to uphold and a trail to blaze, my companies job bid will provide the special chance to have a significant impact on the opportunity to enhance student learning. As of now, no other college in the entire United States has a full scale operations facility with a drilling rig and production equipment. For years, Texas A&M has set the bar high with titans of industry who studied petroleum engineering, such as George P. Mitchell, the father of hydraulic fracturing. A simple step forward in mitigating the lack of adequate hands on learning through the operations facility job bid could very well mold the next great Aggie petroleum engineer. More information on the goals of the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering can be found in the following link. https://engineering.tamu.edu/petroleum/about


-Jacob Fisher

The Operations Facility and the Rig

Implementing an operations facility and a drilling rig for the petroleum engineering department will greatly enhance the learning experience for Aggies by providing them with hands on experience. This project offers a great opportunity to enrich the petroleum engineering program at Texas A&M University. The operations facility and drilling rig will guide students into applying their knowledge in similar real-case scenarios.


-Eric Etete

Big image

What Does It Offer?

The operations facility and drilling rig are planned to be built at reasonable costs. It will provide Aggies with a series of significant tools and components for use in all spectrums of the field . The objective of this project is to promote a hands-on learning environment while offering Aggie's a plethora of resources and advantages. More specifically, the facility will offer many more supplemental equipment for the drilling, reservoir, and planning operation aspects of petroleum engineering.


- Eric Etete

Drilling

Drilling is an essential process for petroleum engineers. Along with the rig, the process consists of a drill string attached to a bit which will perforate the ground, allowing for the extraction of hydrocarbons and fuel resources such as oil and gas. The facility will be integrated with a functional drilling rig that will simulate real life scenario experiences for the Aggie's of the department. Aggie's will be able to study the components for drilling and also work with them under the right supervision. The drilling rig is planned to be installed on a plain land surface,without any irregularities.This portion of land will be situated over a bank of water or aquifer, so that students can practice extraction of liquids as if they were working with oil. It is important to note that constructing a fully functional drilling rig can be expensive.The article ”Cost of Offshore drilling rising as fast as oil prices” posted by David Phillips, a writer of CBS news, gives us an idea of the ranging prices for a drilling rig. Drilling rig prices range from $500,000 and can be more costly. However, it is possible to build a scaled down version of a rig, with just the necessary components, needed to simulate a realistic drilling experience.


More information regarding drilling can be found here.


http://www.flowtechenergy.com/oilfield-equipment/drilling-equipment/



-Eric Etete

Big image

Reservoir and Drainage

The petroleum engineering department at Texas a&m supports reservoir studies heavily. But there is room for improvement.The operation facility will provide extra equipment useful to Aggie's still interested in this particular discipline. The operations facility will offer an Artificial lift, an efficient system utilized for the recovery of oil by the use of pressure pumping. The Artificial lift will be installed on a surface where it can prove to be completely useful. Petroleum engineers depend on the artificial lift when they they are having trouble extracting oil with the basic drilling tools, the system is most useful in land with naturally low pressure underground.


An article explaining artificial lift usage can be found here.


http://www.rigzone.com/training/insight.asp?insight_id=315&c_id=4


-Eric Etete

Big image

Planning

The greatest petroleum engineers are known for their great planning skills. The Planning aspect is related to the use of software and analytical tools to observe the land and surrounding structures. To support planning skills, the operations facility will also offer Personal digital assistants (PDA) and software that can be useful for analyzing land conditions on the operation sites. Contour characteristics and mapping will be greatly analyzed by the software and devices provided. This will serve to inform Aggie's about the different conditions of the land site and if it will be possible to realize drilling and reservoir activity on the site.


To learn about a list of possible software which can be utilized for planning, go to


http://www.scaitul.com/About-SCA-Scientific_Computer_%20Applications.aspx



- Eric Etete

An Answer

With oil prices nearing a seven year low, jobs in the oil and gas industry are becoming very tough to come by. To add to that, a student in petroleum engineering at Texas A&M needs to be able to find an internship before graduating. To help give our Aggie engineers a competitive advantage, we need to change. Resting on your laurels and stagnation are not the way to go, just look at Kyle Field for example. We pushed the initiative in expanding the stadium and now it is the premiere venue in college football. With the athletic improvements done, it's time to update academically. This bid will be the answer to an academic update.


-Erik Muller

Big image

A Better Learning Enviorment

With the approval and construction of this bid, Texas A&M's Harold Vance School of Petroleum Engineering will become a better learning environment. The access to a drilling rig and operations facility will allow for more hands on learning for students. Dr. Catalin Teodoriu, a petroleum engineering professor at the University Oklahoma, writes in his report "Hands-On Teaching as Part of Petroleum Engineering Education: An international Experience" that hands on learning allows for new and innovative ways for solutions to be found. The article also talks about how hands on learning can really help create an understanding of what problems there are on a drilling rig and how to solve them.

Another benefit of this would be allowing for visual learners to better understand and learn about the processes of drilling and production. For one thing, it creates an interest that just talking about the process wouldn't be able to cultivate. In an article by Judy Brown and Michael McGrath titled "Visual Learning in Science and Engineering", they explore how being able to see processes while they are being explained creates a better understanding of more complex ideas. With the complications of understanding drilling and production, this bid will create an environment where students are able to better understand the material presented to them.


More from the article by Dr. Teodoriu can be found here. https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-134438-MS


More from the article by Judy Brown and Michael McGrath can be found here.

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsptp=&arnumber=1510540&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D1510540


-Erik Muller

Big image

A Balanced Program

As mentioned above, Texas A&M's petroleum engineering program is very reservoir heavy. While this is an advantage for people wishing to pursue a job in reservoir engineering after graduation, it can be a detriment for those wishing to go into production or drilling engineering. Just looking at the current degree plan offered, there are significantly more reservoir classes than either production or drilling engineers. However, with the facility there can be more options for classes than involve aspects of production and drilling, creating more well-rounded engineers in the process. This also will allow for better labs in both production and drilling classes, something that is seriously lacking. This proposal will create a more balanced and strong program at Texas A&M.


For the full degree plan, go to https://engineering.tamu.edu/petroleum/academics/degrees/undergraduate/bs


-Erik Muller

Big image

Works Cited

Fisher, Brad. Personal Interview. 16 November 2015.


Phillips, David. ´´Cost of offshore drilling rising as fast as oil prices´´. CBS News. May 8 2008. Web.Nov 28.2015

Jacob Fisher

Proposal Manager

Petroleum Engineer

Texas A&M Class of 2017

Erik Muller

Petroleum Engineer

Proposal Supervisor

Texas A&M Class of 2018