The Wilmer-Hutchins Feeder

Educating ALL students for success

January 17, 2016

Big image

Out of the ash, we rise mightier than before.

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Core Beliefs

OUR MAIN PURPOSE IS TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT.


EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION MAKES THE MOST DIFFERENCE IN STUDENT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE.


THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR POOR QUALITY INSTRUCTION.


WITH OUR HELP, AT RISK STUDENTS WILL PERFORM AT THE SAME RATE AS NON-AT RISK STUDENTS.


STAFF MEMBERS MUST HAVE A COMMITMENT TO CHILDREN AND A COMMITMENT TO THE PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE.

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BIG Ideas on LEADERSHIP by Glenn Furuya


Ka Makani


In Hawaiian, "Ka Makani" means "the wind." Like a cool mountain breeze, real leaders uplift, invigorate and energize. Others create effects more like devastating "hurricanes," depressing "doldrums," all-talk-no-action "hot air" and negative "break winds."


WHAT KIND OF WIND ARE YOU?

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Wilt or Grow



There is no such thing as status quo.

You either wilt or grow.

Enjoy reading the information below.

Educational Leadership

November 2015 | Volume 73 | Number 3
Doing Data Right Pages 16-21


Excerpts from:

Are We Motivating Students with Data?

Caitlin C. Farrell, Julie A. Marsh and Melanie Bertrand


Motivating or Demotivating?

Motivation research identifies classroom practices and activities that shape students' orientation toward goals (Dweck, 2010; Pintrich, 2003).


A performance orientation directs students' attention to grades and achievement and encourages them to compare themselves with others (Ames, 1992; Pope, 2010). Performance-oriented goals are generally associated with negative student outcomes (Meece, Anderman, & Anderman, 2006). Although some students may be motivated by a performance orientation, others may balk at difficult tasks and give up when faced with difficulty (Pintrich, 2003).


Teachers promote a performance orientation when they make most decisions for students, reward achievement relative to others, use rewards to control behavior, provide boring or repetitive tasks, and divert attention from tasks and learning to achievement (Ames, 1992; Epstein, 1988).


In contrast, a mastery orientation, in which students focus on developing new skills and improving their competence, is associated with self-regulation, increased effort, autonomy, and the belief that effort will lead to academic success (Ames, 1992; Pintrich, 2003; Seifert, 2004). Teachers foster a mastery orientation when they focus on individual improvement, recognize and reward effort, evaluate students privately, involve students in decision making, foster students' sense of responsibility and independence, provide meaningful and interesting learning activities, and encourage students to set short-term, self-referenced goals (Ames, 1992; Epstein, 1988).


Questions to Guide Practice

For teachers: What is your purpose in engaging your students with data, and how do you structure your classroom practices to meet these goals? What elements of your data-use practice are inadvertently emphasizing performance? How could you reorganize or refine your data-use practices to reflect a mastery orientation?


For school and district administrators: How are school or district policies and routines framing messages around data for your teachers that might translate to a mastery or performance orientation within classrooms? Do school or district policies and programs emphasize the values of performance, status, and extrinsic rewards; or do these policies recognize effort and growth?


Ames, C. (1992). Classrooms: Goals, structures, and student motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84(3), 261–271.


Dweck, C. S. (2010). Even geniuses work hard. Educational Leadership, 68(1), 16–20.


Epstein, J. L. (1988). Effective schools or effective students: Dealing with diversity. In R. Haskins and D. MacRae (Eds.), Policies for America's public schools: Teachers, equity, and indicators (pp. 89–126). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.


Pope, D. (2010). Beyond "doing school": From "stressed-out" to "engaged in learning." Education Canada, 50(1), 4–8.


Pintrich, P. R. (2003). A motivational science perspective on the role of student motivation in learning and teaching contexts. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(4), 667–686


Seifert, T. (2004). Understanding student motivation. Educational Research, 46(2), 137–149.

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AASI - African-American Success Initiative

AASI principals will meet on January 20, at DCS, rm. 141, from 12:00 - 12:45. Updates and information about the "Tacky Box" initiative will be shared.

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News You Can Use

  1. District-wide Principals Meeting - now at Dallas County Schools Technology and Training Center, 5151 Samuell Blvd, Dallas 75228 (off of I-30 East between Ferguson and Jim Miller)
  2. Data Meetings January 22 - focus on ACP and climate survey results; location TBD; High Schools/Secondary Magnets 12:30-2:00; Elementary and Middle 2:00-3:30
  3. AASI January 20 - African-American Success Initiative schools are WHHS, KCMS, WHES and JN Ervin; Meeting on 1/20 at 12:00 DCS rm. 141
  4. Recess (elementary) - School Board will vote in January; 20 minutes daily; not to be used as a disciplinary consequence; google "go noodle recess" for ideas
  5. Master Schedule (secondary) - careful about teachers needed per course; student needs drive course offerings; principals must be efficient with positions
  6. Demographic Rebuttals - Demographics Office will soon release next year's projections; any rebuttals must first be submitted to EDs for approval/review and should include the principal's detailed projection
  7. Budget - district seeking significant feedback from stakeholders (more info to come)
  8. Early Contracts - HCM will determine the number needed; priority given to bilingual, math and science teachers
  9. Bond phasing - recommendations to the School Board in February

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Mark Your Calendars

Jan. 18 MLK Holiday/ Staff and Students

Jan. 20 District-wide Principals' Meeting at DCS Technology & Training Center

Jan. 20 Dialogue with the Superintendent (4:45-5:45)/ Community Conversations with the Superintendent (6:00-7:00) @ Wilmer-Hutchins High School; ALL W-H PRINCIPALS SHOULD PLAN TO BE PRESENT

Jan. 22 Data Meetings (location TBD) - High School/Secondary Magnets 12:30 - 2:00; Elementary and Middle 2:00 - 3:30

Feb. 1 Damen Lopez (AASI schools) - No Excuses University seminar (location TBD)

Created by Adrian Luna, Executive Director

Wilmer-Hutchins Feeder

Dallas Independent School District

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