KOREAN WAR

1950-1953

Korean War

The Korean War began with 75,000 soldiers from North Korea invading South Korea, crossing the 38th parallel. Americans felt it was the war against international communism. After 3 years the Korean War came to an end with 5 million soldiers and civilians killed. The peninsula is divided still today.
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War against communism

conflict between Communist and non-Communist forces in Korea from June 25, 1950, to July 27, 1953. At the end of World War II, Korea was divided at the 38th parallel into Soviet (North Korean) and U.S. (South Korean) zones of occupation. In 1948 rival governments were established: The Republic of Korea was proclaimed in the South and the People's Democratic Republic of Korea in the North
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United States in the war

Fearing the spread of communism becoming global, we entered the war in Korea. Even though America was at peace with World War 2 ending, the government and military could not stand the thought of communism winning over other countries around the world. Our plan to execute our foreign policy, "containment" began. The U.S. lost over 50,000 soldiers in the Korean War. The war also led to the presidential victory of Dwight D. Eisenhower who had pledged to go to Korea and end the war.
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The United States committed intensive war crimes during the duration of the Cold War. Killing over 1.5 million civilians and soldiers, the populations of countries declined. China's population lost 1.98% and DPRK lost 25% of their population.
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There is not a single family in North Korea which has not lost a loved one in the course of the Korean War.
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the Navy was not used as much in the Korean war as it was in WW2
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Nobody won the Korean War. The peninsula is still divided today. North Korea are communists and South Korea are anticommunists.