Figurative Language

Cassidy Gaillard

Poems with Figurative Language

  • Flint: Christina Rosetti, "An Emerald is as green as grass" the poem "Flint" uses a great deal of similes. The simile that I chose is explaining how green the grass is.
  • The Dirtiest Man in the World Shel Silverstein, "Oh, I'm dirty Dan, the worlds dirtiest man" the poem, "The Dirties Man in the World" uses a hyperbole to explain how dirty he really is. But I am sure he is not the dirtiest man in the world they author is just exaggerating.
  • Popcorn James Stevenson, "I hear the pop, pop, pop". An onomatopoeia is used in the poem "Popcorn". The poem "Popcorn" is explaining what they hear when they pop popcorn. The author says that so the reader will have a clear idea of what it is like to hear the sound of popcorn
  • White Mary O'Neil, "White is a cool breeze, wind on my cheek, a whisper, sandwiches at lunch, wholesome milk, soft, puffy marshmallows in hot chocolate, my younger sisters laughter echoing down the hall. Lacey angel wings mounds of snow and snowball fights. Clouds drifting across the sky on this beautiful morning." the poem "White" is using imagery. The author is is using imagery to make the reader like they are really there. Using Taste, touch, smell, sight, sounds like.

Independent Reading Book

  • While reading the book Forge I came across a lot of figurative language. "The cold was a beast gnawing at my fingers and toes (3)." This quote from the book represents a metaphor. The author said that to show that the character was in the freezing cold and his hands felt like they were being chewed off by the cold.
  • Going threw chapter 5 I found an onomatopoeia. The book Forge has many different examples of onomatopoeia's because there a plenty war scenes. "firing guns were quick followed by the thud, thud, thud of musketballs hitting the dirt and fence rails around us (23)." The author says that to give you a clear meaning of what the character felt/heard.so
  • Scrolling threw chapter 18 I find a well written simile. "The lad's attempts at cussing like a soldier made him sound instead like a mild-mouthed granny (95)." This simile is trying to explain how one of the lads could barely cuss it reminded the character of a granny.
  • "The memory of our escape still tormented me nine months later. It did not matter that i'd found us shelter and work in Jersey or that I'd kept us safe. Isabel was ungrateful, peevish, and vexatious (6)." Once I stepped into chapter 1 I found myself reading a flashback "The memory of our escape still tormented me nine months later." The reason the author started the book like that was to give the reader some background information on who they will be reading about.
  • "The sunset burned red (125)." The author is exaggerating! the sun doesn't really burn red. This is what I call a hyperbole. A hyperbole is used when something or someone is exaggerating. The author said, "The sunset burned red." so that the reader would have a clear vivid mind of the sun hot and dark.
Finding Nemo - Trailer
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