SAVE TEXAS WATER

REYAAN TYLER KEVIN CHARLES

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM?

Texas has been known for it's heat, but this time it's the real deal. We are currently in the midst of a terrible drought that will evidently go down in history as the 2nd worst drought Texas has ever had. While excess heat is indeed negative, the true problem is with the water supply. According to TexasMonthly, by 2016, the water demand will be up 22%. Unfortunately, the water supply will be down 10%. This is a big fear for those working behind the scenes in the Texas Water Development Board, and it should be just as frightening for all of us as well.

WHAT DO WE KNOW?

In order to solve a problem like this, we need to know the background information about the situation. Water is a complex form of matter, but it's nothing an ordinary person couldn't understand. The water we ourselves use is either surface water (lakes, rivers, reservoirs), ground water (accessible through wells), and waste water (treated for reuse). When we look at our water usage from an ecological perspective, a problem is very clear. A toilet flush uses 5 gallons of water. A 15 minute shower uses 90 gallons of water. This shortage is only going to get worse if we don't conserve.

What is the state doing?

The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), created in 1957 after the worst drought in Texas history, has been doing some work on the legal end of this situation. Last year, they proposed a new water plan that would total $53 billion over the next 50 years. The plan heavily supports the use of wastewater, the reused water described earlier. The new plan is also in favor of tapping new underground water, as well as desalination, the convenient although costly process of removing salt from saltwater.

WHAT CAN WE DO?

The state is out there doing there conducting their own deals, but what about us citizens? Although it may not seem like it, our part in this situation is almost as important, while it is at the same time quite a bit easier. All we ourselves have to do is work to conserve the amount of water daily. Since 15 minutes in the shower uses 90 gallons of water, one could shorten their shower to 5 minutes and only use 30 gallons. We can quit doing nonsensical things like brushing with the sink on and leaving the sprinklers on too long. While the state is dealing with expensive methods to save water, our part in the cause shouldn't cost us a dime.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING!