The Amendments

By: Trina Miller

First Amendment: Freedom of Speech

Boring v. Buncombe Bd. of Educ., 136 F.3d 364 (4th Cir. 1998)


A drama teacher selected a piece for her students to perform. In this play the daughter is a lesbian and she has a child. They got top honors at their regional competition. The principal found out about what the play was about and what was in it and said that they could not perform the play anymore. Eventually he let them perform it, but parts of it had to be cut out. The issue with this was that the parents were upset about it and the principal agreed saying that the parents needed to be informed first about what their children are performing. The teacher claimed that it was her first Amendment right to do which ever type of play she would like. The ruling on the case came out that the teacher did not have the right to do the play without the permission of the administration and the parents because she is in the school so her freedom of speech is limited. This is important to us today because we also lose many of our right when we enter into the school.


"Boring v. Buncombe Bd. of Educ., 136 F.3d 364 (4th Cir. 1998)." First Amendment Center. N.p., 11 Nov. 2015. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/freedoms/case.aspx?id=1682>.

First Amendment: Freedom of Press

Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union, 521 U.S. 844 (1997)


There was a Act passed to protect minors from things on the internet that they shouldn't be seeing. Many people challenged this saying that this was a violation of freedom of speech. it went to the supreme court and they said that this Act was against online freedom of press, but they would still like to protect the minors. This relates to us today because we are all minors and we all use a computer. It is important that we are all protected from bad things on the internet.


"First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case." First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case. N.p., 11 Nov. 2015. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/freedoms/case.aspx?id=336>.

First Amendment: Freedom of Religion

Zelman V. Simmons-Harris, 536 U.S. 639 (2002)


A voucher program was put in place for schools in Cleveland, but it turns out that the schools that this was put in place for were all schools that were religious schools. Some were public and some private, but all were religious schools. Local taxpayers said that this was unconstitutional because it only helped the religious schools. The result was that the program provided neutral benefits for all schools it just so happened to be that the ones that had chosen it so far were all religious schools. So it did not violate the first amendment. This is relates to us today because we have things like free and reduced lunches. This could happen to us if none of the religious schools have that for their kids.



"First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case." First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case. N.p., 11 Nov. 2015. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/freedoms/case.aspx?id=659>.

First Amendment: Freedom of Petition

Kings Mall V. Wenk


Veterans from the Armed Services were protesting the government's involvement in Iraq. They chose to do it here because there was a military recruitment center nearby. The plaintiff said that they were protesting. The case went in favor of the plaintiff. This still happens today. There is many people that will protest until they are taken away by a person of authority.



"Kings Mall v. Wenk (Defending Right to Petition Government for Redress of Grievances) | New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) - American Civil Liberties Union of New York State." Kings Mall v. Wenk (Defending Right to Petition Government for Redress of Grievances) | New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) - American Civil Liberties Union of New York State. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <http://www.nyclu.org/case/kings-mall-v-wenk-defending-right-petition-government-redress-of-grievances>.

First Amendment: Freedom of Assembly

Hsu V. Roslyn School District, 85 F.3d 839(2nd Cir. 1996)


A group of students at Roslyn High School created a bible group for students to go to. The School then contacted the officers because not all of members that were on the board were Christians. The school told the students that they could only elect students to the board that were of the Christian faith. The students said that this violated their amendment of freedom of assembly. The ruling was that this did violate their right to assembly. The court said that if electing leaders to the board because of certain beliefs was relevant to the club then the school could say that, but in this case the school was violating their right to freedom of assembly. This is relevant to us today because we have many clubs in our school. If some day someone were to make a group like this the same type of thing could happen.



"First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case." First Amendment Schools: The Five Freedoms - Court Case. N.p., 12 Nov. 2015. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <http://www.firstamendmentschools.org/freedoms/case.aspx?id=1679>.

Fourth Amendment: Protection from Unreasonable Searches

Mapp V. Ohio


The police were looking for a criminal and got an anonymous tip that he was hiding out at a girl named Dollree's house. They knocked on the door and no one answered so they went into the house. When they entered the house she asked to see a warrant and when they showed her she took it and hid it under her clothing. They handcuffed her and found obscene materials in her home, but they never found the criminal. The court ruled that the police were violating the fourth amendment. This relates to us today because many criminals hide out in other people's houses still today.





"Mapp V. Ohio." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 12 Nov. 2015. Web. 12 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapp_v._Ohio>.

Sixth Amendment: Right to a Fair and Speedy Trial

Davis V. Washington


Davis was arrested for beating a girl. She called the police and the call was used against Davis in the trial. He claimed that this was a violation of his sixth amendment right. He said that using the tape without him being able to cross examine. He also claimed that he was not granted his right to confront his accuser. The ruling was that the sixth amendment rights did not apply because his case was "non-testimonial". The girl was not a witness so she did not have to appear to be cross-examined. This applies to us today because people are cross-examined in court all the time.



"Davis V. Washington." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 13 Nov. 2015. Web. 13 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_v._Washington>.

Eighth Amendment: No Excessive Bail

United States V. Bajakajian


A man was caught taking money out of the country without reporting it to customs. They forfeited the money, but it wasn't connected to any criminal action. He claims he was traveling to Italy to pay of a debt he owed. He was charged with lying to customs, but the charge was dropped. The judge of the case found that the forfeiture of the money was a violation of the Eighth Amendment. The man was supposed to go to jail for 6 months, but the judge did not force the sentence to him. It went to the supreme court and they ruled against the judge. They said that forfeiture of the money was allowed. The problem now was that was this a violation of his Eighth Amendment rights because he was charged with anything else. They ruled that he was charged with excessive fines. This is important to society today because many people travel with large amounts of cash especially if it is for a business. It is important to report it to customs.



"United States V. Bajakajin." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 2 Feb. 2015. Web. 15 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Bajakajian>.