Harriet Tubman

Conductor of the Underground Railroad : poster made by Ethan

this book is about the life of a slave who puts her life in danger for other slaves. A very brave person who leads slaves to freedom and a new life.

1820-1830

Harriet is born on the plantation of Edward Brodas. she spends a part of her life working on the plantation. One night she gets a huge gash upon her forehead, leaving, in it's place, very large scar.

1831-1840

in 1831, Harriet started to where a bandanna. The bandanna was to show that she was not a little girl anymore. She would do any job assigned to her when she worked in the fields, for she felt free in them. by the time it was near 1840, she was to run away.

1841-1850

in 1843, Harriet had began working a patchwork quilt. She thought it was the hardest she had taken on. One day in 1849, she met a white woman. She asked Harriet's name and how she got the scar on her head. Harriet told the story and then, whenever the woman saw Harriet in the fields, she would stop and talk to her.

1851-1860

from 1851 to 1857, the country came closer to civil war. In 1856, she had rescued a party of four slaves from Maryland. That same year, she had rescued Joe Bailey. In 1856, a civil war had already broken out in Kansas. In 1857, Harriet was working in a hotel in Capemay, New Jersey. On April 27, 1860, Harriet spent the night in Troy, New York. She was going to Boston to attend an Anti-Slavery meeting.

1861-1870

In 1861, Harriet was back in Boston. In the time that she was there, John A. Andrew was inaugurated as governor of Massachusetts. In January of 1863, Harriet saw for the first time, a regiment of ex-slaves parading down the streets. In 1864, Harriet went south to visit Old Rit and Ben. With her, she brought an bundle of letters and passes. In 1865, Harriet was working at the Countraband Hospital. Also in 1865, Harriet was there when Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Court House. Seven nights after Lee's surrender President Lincoln died from a gunshot wound to the back of the head by John Wilkes Booth on April 15, 1865.