The Solar Nebular Theory!

What is it? What does it say? Who discovered it? And, when?

Introduction

Have you ever just looked off in the distance and wondered, "How did Earth come to be?". Well, if you have, I am about to answer that question for you! Have you ever heard of the term Solar Nebular Theory? This theory is what keys us in on just what is most likely to be the reasoning as to how Earth, along with the other planets and the sun, formed to be what they are now. Within this flyer, I am going to tell you what the Solar Nebular Theory is, what is states, who discovered it, and when they discovered it.

WHAT IS THE SOLAR NEBULAR THEORY, and WHAT DOES IT STATE?

The Solar Nebular Theory, also known as the nebular hypothesis, is a theory that tells us how the solar systems were formed. According to the Nebular Theory, it more/less says that stars form in huge clouds of molecular hydrogen called GMC's (giant molecular clouds). The clouds are gravitationally unstable, and matter comes together to form denser clumps inside. When the clouds collapse and fall apart, they form stars. The stars can then "give birth" to planets under the right conditions (which are not fully understood and interpreted). When you look at it, it basically states that the formation of planet systems is a natural result of a star formation. This process is thought to take at least 100 million years.

WHO DISCOVERED THE THEORY, and WHEN DID THEY DISCOVER IT?

The Solar Nebular Theory was not developed by one person. The development came to be by the brainstorming and working of Emanuel Swedenborg, Immanuel Kant, and Pierre-Simon Laplace, in the 18th Century. Kant believed that gaseous clouds gradually collapse and flatten due to gravity and eventually form stars and planets. Laplace had a similar belief which said that a nebular cloud contracted and cooled, flattening and shedding rings of material in the process with later collapsed and formed planets. Within the 20th Century, the models and beliefs of the men were challenged by various amounts of other theorists who believed in their own models, trying to prove theirs were better. In the end, none of the attempts were successful until the 1970's when the astronomer, Victor Safronov, accepted the model (along with many others). It became known as the Nebular Disk Model.

BY: MACKENZY LEWALLEN