Trace Evidence Study

Jason Hogle Forensic Science Period 5

Item #1: Key

  • A locksmith might be able to tell what type of lock it fits.
  • The key can be traced back to any number of sources where you could potentially get a name,mans address of a potential suspect.

Item #2: Dirt/Soil

  • A pedologist or a geologist might be able to tell you what type of soil it is.
  • The soil can be narrowed down to a geographical profile to figure out approximately where or what radius the crime was committed in, or where the perpetrator lives.

Item #3: Twist Tie

  • We could go to different bakeries or bread manufactures to see which brand of bread that that this specific tie belongs to.
  • We could use this information to figure out what bread the perpetrator buys. If it is a less well known brand then we can narrow down the suspect pool a little more.

Item #4: Chewed Gum

  • We could give this gum to an odontologist and pull a partial dental impression off of it.
  • This could be used to find an absolute suspect if no one else has a similar bite mark.

Item #5: Colored Pencil Lead

  • This could be given to a forensic chemist to study the different chemicals in the lead to see if there is a unique or specific chemical mixing.
  • The chemical components of this specific colored pencil lead could be unique to one brand and could be used to narrow down a suspect pool, if a suspect has this specific colored pencil.

Item #6: Copper Wire

  • The copper wire could be brought to an electrician to determine if the wire belongs to a specific wire or electrical cord.
  • If it belongs to a specific type of wire or cord then a suspect pool can be narrowed down to those who actually uses this cord in someplace they are frequently.

Item #7: Toe/Finger Nail

  • A forensic DNA specialist can be used to examine the nail to see if they can extract DNA from the clipping.
  • If DNA is pulled from the clipping then an exact match can be found if the suspects DNA is in the system.

Item #8: Hair

  • The hair can be given to a forensic specialist to see if they can extract any DNA from the strand of hair.
  • If DNA can be obtained form the sample then we can find an exact suspect if their DNA is on file.

Item #9: Wax

  • This can be given to a candle maker to see if it is a specific kind of wax that is used to make the candle.
  • If it belongs to a specific candle, then the suspect pool can be narrowed down by who owns that brand of candle.

Item #10: Burnt Match

  • The match can be given to a forensic chemist to determine if the chemicals in the head of the match belong to any one brand.
  • If they match a brand then a suspect pool can be narrowed down based on who owns those specific matches.

Item #11: Paint Chip

  • The paint chip can be brought to a chemist to study the specific compounds used in making the paint.
  • If it belongs to a specific paint then suspect pool can be narrowed down by who has an object with this specific paint.

Item #12: Paint Dust

  • The paint dust can be brought to a chemist to study the specific compounds used in making the paint.
  • If it belongs to a specific paint then suspect pool can be narrowed down by who has an object with this specific paint.

Item #13: Banana Peel

  • This can be given to a pomologist or a botanist to see if the banana is a specific type or brand of banana.
  • If the banana is a specific kind or from a specific place, then we can narrow down suspect pool by who also has that specific banana.

Item #14: Bean/Seed

  • This can be brought to a botanist to see if it belongs to a specific plant that makes this seed or bean.
  • Suspect pool can be narrowed down if this specific plant is owned by a suspect or if they buy the seeds or beans of that specific plant.

Item #15: Button

  • This button can be brought to a seamstress to determine if it is a specific brand or type of button.
  • The suspect pool can be narrowed down by the people who own a similar brand that uses that button.