Civil Rights Leaders

Haylee BIlbray

" Where justice is denied, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Fredrick Douglass

Fredrick Douglass

Frederick Douglass has been called the father of the civil rights movement. He became successful through determination, brilliance, and eloquence to shape the American nation. He was an abolitionist, human rights and women's rights activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. Committed to freedom, Douglass dedicated his life to achieving justice for all Americans.

Douglass wrote an autobiography named " A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass". This book conveys Douglass' struggles of slavery, learning how to read, and his liberation.

"By any means necessary." — Malcolm X

Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - MLK

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, both a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Through his activism, he played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African-American citizens in the South and other areas of the nation, as well as the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among several other honors. King was assassinated in April 1968, and continues to be remembered as one of the most lauded African-American leaders in history, often referenced by his 1963 speech, "I Have a Dream."

In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemy's, but the silence of our friends"