Devin's grain shop

All freshly made

we are the best out there

we make the best freshest bread that you could have. We make all kinds for some examples of what we have: bread rolls, oatmeal, white breads, white rices, tortillas, and breakfast cereals.

opening hours:

monday - 9:00 - 3:00

tuesday - 9:00 - 3:00

wensday - 9:00 - 3:00

thursday - 9:00 - 3:00

friday - 9:00 - 3:00

best sellers out here

You can call us or look at are website we have also made, and here to your left you will see are logo of our website.

whole grains and refined grains

Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice.


- See more at: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/grains#sthash.KDEyaT1o.dpuf

Health Benifits

  • Most vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. None have cholesterol. (Sauces or seasonings may add fat, calories, and/or cholesterol.)
  • Vegetables are important sources of many nutrients, including potassium, dietary fiber, folate (folic acid), vitamin A, and vitamin C.
  • Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Vegetable sources of potassium include sweet potatoes, white potatoes, white beans, tomato products (paste, sauce, and juice), beet greens, soybeans, lima beans, spinach, lentils, and kidney beans.
  • Dietary fiber from vegetables, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as vegetables help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories.
  • - See more at: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables-nutrients-health#sthash.Mj9cAZwL.dpuf

    Food Labels

    1. Look at Serving Size

    Start by looking at the nutrition facts and the serving size. Packages frequently contain more than a single serving, which means that you may have to multiply all of the amounts listed to get an accurate picture of how many calories or how much sugar is in a single container.

    2. Check Calorie Count

    Although calories are only part of the picture when it comes to reading labels, they’re vital to help you determine appropriate portion size. The standard daily caloric intake guidelines are 1,800-2,200 calories for adult women and 2,200-2,500 for adult men. (These calculations vary according to physical activity.) So, if you choose a food with 700 calories per serving, keep in mind that is approximately one-third of your daily calorie intake.