Clauses

Main, Subordinate, Adjective, and Noun

Clause Types

There are four different types of clauses: main, subordinate, adjective, and noun. A main clause has a subject, verb, and allows the sentence to have a complete thought. A subordinate clause has a subordinate conjunction, subject, verb, and it will have an incomplete thought. An adjective clause has a relative pronoun or adverb, a subject with a verb, or simply just a verb, and can't be a complete sentence by itself, like the subordinate clauses. A noun clause is any sentence that replaces the noun in it with a clause that can act as a subject.

Examples of Causes

Main:

Bad kids lie.

This clause has a subject and a verb, ending in a complete thought.

Kids= subject and lie= verb


Subordinate:

When bad kids lie

This clause has a subordinate conjunction, a subject and a verb, but it is an incomplete thought.

When= subordinate conjunction, kids= subject, and lie= verb


Adjective:

Whom Jerry took to the dance

This clause has a relative pronoun, a subject, and a verb, but it does not form a complete sentence.

Whom= relative pronoun, Jerry= subject, and took= verb

Another example would be:

That had made a mess

This clause has a relative pronoun, used as a subject, and a verb, but it does not form a complete sentence.

That= relative pronoun (subject) and made= verb


Noun:

Stacy had a lot of homework.

In this clause, the noun is Stacy. To make this noun a noun clause, we replace Stacy (the noun) with a clause that can act as the noun, Stacy.

That girl with the blonde hair had a lot of homework.

In this clause, "Stacy" was replaced with "that girl with the blonde hair," which is a noun clause.