Alexander the Great

Alex

Alexander the Great served as king of Macedonia from 336 to 323 B.C. During his time of leadership, he united Greece, reestablished the Corinthian League and conquered the Persian Empire.
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Alex

Alexander received his earliest education under the tutelage of Leonidas. Leonidas, who had been hired by King Phillip to tell Alexander about math, and horsemanship he struggled to control his rebellious student. Alexander's next tutor was Lysimachus, who used role-playing to get the restless boy's attention. Alexander liked to impersonate the warrior Achilles.
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Alex

In 343 B.C., King Philip II hired the philosopher Aristotle to teach Alexander at the Temple of the Nymphs at Meiza. Over the course of three years, Aristotle taught Alexander and a bunch of his friends philosophy, poetry, drama, and science. Seeing that Homer's Iliad inspired Alexander to dream of becoming a heroic warrior, Aristotle created an abridged version of the tome for Alexander to carry with him on military campaigns.

Alexander finished his education at Meiza in 340 B.C. A year later, while still just a teenager, he became a soldier and embarked on his first military mission , against the Thracian tribes.

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Alex

The Hellenistic Age 336-30 BC (from Alexander’s crowning to the death of Cleopatra)

Hellenistic cultures

the four cultures it combines are Greece,India,Egypt,and persia

Hellenistic

The Hellenistic Age is the transformation of Greek society from the localized and introverted city-states to an open culture that included the entire eastern Mediterranean, and Southwest Asia. While the Hellenistic world incorporated a number of people, Greek thinking, mores, and life dominated the public affairs of the time. All aspects of culture took a Greek hue, with the Greek talk being established as the official language of the Hellenistic world. The art and literature of the era were transformed accordingly. Instead of the last preoccupation with the Ideal, Hellenistic art relied on the Real. Depictions of man in both art and literature revolved around exuberant, and often amusing themes that for the most part explored the daily life and the emotional world of humans and gods.