Dictators Devastate the World

Smore By Noah Kahan

People Included

Noah Kahan, Shane Vincent, Zack Perkerson, Caleb Presley, and Russell Wagner.

The Overlying Question and How it Relates to the Story We've Read

The question we have decided to research was, "How do dictators and other unfair government officials take over and how can we stop that from happening?" The setting in the story takes place when Hitler and the Nazis take over Germany and shows the struggle of a boy named Karl Stern through this time. Hitler, being unfair to others and singling out people who didn't share traits he liked, was a large reason we decided to research dictators and other unfair governments.

History Lesson

This problem is not made up in the book. Hitler was a real person in history, an evil and psychotic monster who wanted to have the world formed in his own image. Karl and his family aren't real but their struggles are alike to a great extent of people, not just the Jews people. Hitler took over Germany on January 30, 1933 and from that day he expanded his empire causing war all over the war along with their allies, like Italy, Japan, Hungary, Romania, and Bulgaria who all wanted the world in an image of their own.

In early 1933 Adolf Hitler came to power as the Fuhrer of Germany. This began the discrimination against the Jewish race. On September 1st, 1939 war had officially began in Europe. The war began when Nazi Germany invaded Poland resulting in Britian and France declaring war. This was after Karl and his sister had left Nazi Germany to go to New York City. 1941 marked the year of the beginning of the Holocaust and when the United States entered the war on December 7, 1941 when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Over the course of the Holocaust 1.5 million children were killed and 9.5 million Jewish adults. Totally a devastating 11 million Jewish people dead. During the long 6 years of harsh war a total of 60 million people were killed, including all nations, civilians, soldiers. And a total of 25 million people were wounded. The war eventually came to an end on May 7th, 1945 in Europe and September 2nd, 1945 in Japan. The war was exactly 6 years and 1 day. The nations that were involved in the most devastating war of history on the Allies as follow The United States, Great Britain, France, China, Canada, Australia, The Netherlands, Brazil, Greece, Denmark, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Poland, Belgium, The USSR and Yugoslavia. The Axis powers consisted of Germany, Italy, Japan, Hungary, Romania, and Bulgaria.


World War II ended in Europe when the Fuhrer of Germany, Adolf Hitler, committed suicide in his military bunker. After his death Germany signed off of surrender on May 7th, 1945. The war in the Pacific ended when the United States dropped nuclear bombs on both cities Nagasaki and Hiroshima. After the 2 bombings Japan signed a declaration of surrender on September 2nd, 1945.



The Nazis were cruel enough to even kill the jews and do other painful stiff to them, just because the Nazis thought they were interfering with plans to attack and the fact that they were fighting back. They whipped them, drowned them, and even assassinated them. First they thought the jews were spying on the Nazis, but they weren’t. So the Nazis invaded camps and killed every jew that they could see.

World War II: How Did It Start?

Continuing the Lesson

Though this idea of crazy people taking over is hard to imagine, but there are people like Kim Jong-Un taking hold of North Korea. By the early 2000s, the people began to recover. The markets, which initially emerged as a survival mechanism, gradually grew to encompass a broader range of goods and services and became better established. The markets today are the major source of food for ordinary North Koreans. South Korea also adopted the “Sunshine Policy”, in which it gave unconditional aid to North Korea, and increased economic cooperation between the Koreas. Established in 2003, the Kaesong Industrial Complex just north of the DMZ was part of this policy and now allows South Korean companies to hire over 50,000 North Korean workers. China also gradually strengthened its economic relationship with North Korea, and today is by far North Korea’s most important economic and political partner. Nevertheless, ordinary North Koreans continue to face the severe challenges of chronic food shortages and grinding poverty, while their basic freedoms are curtailed by a repressive regime whose number one concern is staying in power.


http://www.libertyinnorthkorea.org/learn-north-korea-history/


(visual lesson on the history of North Korea and its government)

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What the U.S. is Doing to Help Stop the Unlimited Government's

There is not much we can do for the people of north korea because if we go try to take over north korea than the most likely result is that kim jong-un will fire there a-bombs or h-bombs at all of the old allied forces potentially causing world war 3. For now the most that we can do to help the citizens of north korea is to help the few that escaped from the country get new jobs and houses.

The Progression of the Most Devastating Conflict to Ever Meet the Face of the Earth!

In early 1933 Adolf Hitler came to power as the Fuhrer of Germany. This began the discrimination against the Jewish race. On September 1st, 1939 war had officially began in Europe. The war began when Nazi Germany invaded Poland resulting in Great Britian and France declaring war. This was after Karl and his sister had left Nazi Germany to go to New York City. 1941 marked the year of the beginning of the Holocaust and when the United States entered the war on December 7, 1941 when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Over the course of the Holocaust 1.5 million children were killed and 9.5 million Jewish adults. Totally a devastating 11 million Jewish people dead. During the long 6 years of harsh war a total of 60 million people were killed, including all nations, civilians, soldiers. And a total of 25 million people were wounded. The war eventually came to an end on May 7th, 1945 in Europe and September 2nd, 1945 in Japan. The war was exactly 6 years and 1 day. The nations that were involved in the most devastating war of history on the Allies as follow The United States, Great Britain, France, China, Canada, Australia, The Netherlands, Brazil, Greece, Denmark, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Poland, Belgium, The USSR and Yugoslavia. The Axis powers consisted of Germany, Italy, Japan, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria. -(SV). Finally, on June 22, 1941, Germany and its allies launched Operation Barbarossa, a massive invasion of the Soviet Union from the Baltic shore in the north to the Black Sea in the South. The Soviets were caught by surprise. (The USSR knew Germany would attack eventually and had planned on the various scenarios but did not expect the invasion so soon.) Their military leadership had been decimated by Stalin’s purges of the 1930's, in which he removed—often killed—many of the most effective commanders and replaced them with political stooges. In the Finnish-Soviet War (Winter War) between November 30, 1939 and March 12, 1940, tiny Finland repeatedly stymied an invasion by the giant Soviet Union for months until finally forced to yield to overwhelming numbers; the peace settlement gave the Soviets 25,000 square miles of Finnish territory.

Initially, the Axis invasion of the USSR was a dramatic success. The invading wave swept steadily eastward, reaching the gates of Moscow by the beginning of 1942, but Soviet determination and much greater numbers of men and equipment, combined with the vast distances and severe weather of the USSR halted the onslaught and forced a German retreat.

At Stalingrad two combatants fought a vicious, building-by-building, street-by-street battle from July 17, 1942, to February 2, 1943. In November 1942, the Soviets launched a two-prong counterattack that encircled and ultimately captured the German Sixth Army at Stalingrad. The Red forces advanced westward rapidly until halted in the Third Battle of Kharkov. In the spring of 1943, a bulge developed in the Soviet lines near Kursk. That summer, the Germans struck with their own two-prong assault, intending to isolated and capture or destroy Soviet forces within that bulge. Both sides committed large numbers of men and material; Kursk has long been believed to have been the largest tank battle in history but recent research is casting doubt on the long-accepted numbers. At any rate, the German offensive failed. From that point on, Soviet forces advanced westward, entering the German capital of Berlin in April 1945. - (NK)

World War II: How Did It End?

The Devastating Conflict Comes to a Close.


World War II ended in Europe when the Fuhrer of Germany, Adolf Hitler, committed suicide in his military bunker. After his death Germany signed off of surrender on May 7th, 1945. The war in the Pacific ended when the United States dropped nuclear bombs on both cities Nagasaki and Hiroshima. After the 2 bombings Japan signed a declaration of surrender on September 2nd, 1945. - (SV)

To Stop Korea

North Korea is making headlines again. And this time, Seth Rogen and James Franco’s The Interview has nothing to do with it.

Recent news reports have emerged of a North Korean defector who alleges that Kim Jong-un tested chemical and biological weapons on his own people. The defector, whom we know only as “Mr. Lee,” says he has the evidence on a storage device that he will present to the European Parliament in the next few weeks. “Mr. Lee” is not the first to come forward in an attempt to expose the Kim regime’s unethical weapons testing on humans. Over the years, there have been several accounts of Kim’s testing on the disabled, including children.

Does this sound familiar? Inhumane testing of chemical and biological weapons on the innocent and disabled? It should. It’s what Adolf Hitler did during World War II. If this seems like a radical assertion, well, it’s not. During WWII, many (including some in the United States) did not believe—and really could not fathom, as it was so atrocious and then unprecedented—that Hitler was committing such heinous and gruesome crimes in the concentration camps. How many more defectors are going to need to come forward before we take these allegations seriously, and do something to intervene? After all, defectors like “Mr. Lee” are not pleading with Beijing to come help them out, they are making a run for the EU to plead for help.

In addition to testing such devastating weapons on his own people, Kim has some of the traits of another brutal, authoritative leader: Joseph Stalin. Kim’s leadership purges are textbook-Stalin. In fact, Stalin was so paranoid about his own commanders, it is said that the former Soviet leader did not like it when his subordinates stood behind him in a room; he wanted to be able to see them all at all times, in front of him. Kim suffers from a similar paranoia—one that leads him to mistrust everyone close to him, including his own family members, and so he kills them off preemptively to avoid being overthrown.

So what can the international community do? Well, for starters, we should not ignore or fluff off reports of Kim’s chemical and biological weapons testing.

North Korea’s increasing nuclear weapons tests should also be cause for concern. As Tom Nichols has asserted, the fact that we cannot be sure who really runs the weapons show in a rogue state such as North Korea makes it difficult to negotiate with it. Secondly, if North Korea is conducting more nuclear weapons tests and indeed testing biological and chemical weapons, its arsenal would be greatly enhanced.

The only country that may still be able to exert influence on North Korea—China—does not seem to be enthusiastic about doing so, and is not particularly fond of the current regime. So what other options are there?

Some have called upon the United States to bring North Korea to the negotiating table and at least talk with its leaders one-on-one. And while the Six Party Talks between North Korea, the United States, Japan, China, Russia and South Korea are a good idea in theory, the conflicting national interests of all parties involved has made negotiating nearly impossible. It seems, then, that a trilateral dialogue between North Korea, the United States and China might be more effective, if for no other reason than it reduces the number of participants.

However, ideally, if we could trust China to follow through, without having to make any grand deals with Beijing as incentive, a bilateral dialogue between China and North Korea would probably be better, since North Korea doesn’t trust America or really any other Western nation for that matter, but it might still be willing to listen to China. So far, however, Pyongyang has remained intransigent. But if the Iran deal holds up, proving that “rogue states” can indeed be reasoned with, perhaps even more pressure can be exerted on North Korea as a nuclear holdout that needs to reform.

The ultimate challenge that the international community will face with regards to North Korea is how to convince the Kim regime to act better without pushing it to war. And we likely cannot do it without China. It’s unclear what strategy would be best for China to employ. Perhaps, taking a cue from Franco’s character in The Interview, Beijing could attempt to approach North Korea and say, “We are same-same...but different. But still same.” That is, China could appeal to North Korea as one “big” Asian power to another, acknowledging their different national-security interests, but asserting that both China and North Korea want a stable, safe Asia continent (regardless of how true this might be, it’s all about diplomacy) and in order to achieve that, both sides have to refrain from biological, chemical and nuclear-weapons testing.

Beijing is probably our only hope to stop Kim. Getting North Korea to play nice with everyone, including its own people, will involve getting China on board.

http://www.nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/how-stop-the-north-korea-nightmare-dead-its-tracks-13389

(site where this info came from)

the Similarities and Differences of Kim Jung-Un and Adolf Hitler

Kim Jong-un and Hitler can be very similar. One way is that they both are evil dictators. Hitler Wanted to kill all of the Jewish race, and took away their rights as a human being. Kim Jong-un is not doing what Hitler did but they are killing generations of families even when only 1 person disagrees with their government, or if they attempt to escape. Hitler did the same thing to anyone but to Jews more. Unlike Germany, North Korea is isolated and tries not to release anything to the public. They are both very cruel and evil dictators ,and most would agree we would be better off without them.


Links and Why They're Usefull

This link was just making fun of Kim Jong Un for the most part and did not help towards our project. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2015/02/kim-jong-un-north-korea-understanding

http://users.dickinson.edu/~osborne/myers/power. It shows how north korea is relevant to our situation in the book against the Nazis.

/www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007671,

This link was helpful because it explains about hitler and the nazis, as well a s when they came to power.

This website shows how most dictators come to power and answers our second question http://www.politicalsystems.com/dictatorship.html

This link helped us get to a better likk and also give us a bases on our problem https://www.quora.com/What-can-we-do-to-stop-the-North-Korean-dictatorship.

http://www.uscirf.gov/advising-government/congressional-testimony/life-inside-north-korea This source is helpful because it shows why the modern day problem is similar to the problem in the book.

This link helps show us what the U.S. is doing to help the citizens of north korea http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2792.htm





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