CIC Design Challenge

AISD Innovation Summit May 7th, 2016

Design & Thinking - Official Trailer

What ideas from the trailer resonated with you?

What is Design Thinking?

Loosely put, design thinking is a set of tools, methods, and processes by which we develop new answers for challenges, big and small. Through applying design thinking to challenges, we learn to define problems, understand needs and constraints, brainstorm innovative solutions, and seek and incorporate feedback about our ideas in order to continually make them better. The more we apply design thinking to the challenges we see, the deeper we strengthen the belief in our ability to generate creative ideas and make positive change happen in the world.


Excerpted from Design Thinking in Schools

CIC Community...

What are one or two barriers to transformational technology and innovation on your campus?

Are there any common patterns emerging?

What are our MOST significant "pain points" or priorities?

How might we better understand and solve for our technology and innovation needs?

Challenge Mapping

Challenge mapping is a process used to explore a wide variety of problem statements in order to select the ones most advantageous to solve.
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The Power of Language

"How might we...?" is a very intentional sentence stem.


  • "HOW" assumes that solutions exist and provides the creative confidence needed to identify and solve for unmet needs.
  • "MIGHT" says that we can put ideas out there that might work, or might not - either way, we'll learn something useful.
  • "WE" signals that we are going to collaborate and build on each other's ideas to find creative solutions together.
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Instructions for Challenge Mapping

Examine the challenge statement, or "How might we..." question.


  • Ask “Why is this important?” and use the answers to craft additional “How might we” challenge statements. Place these ideas above the original challenge statement.

  • Now ask, “What is stopping us from. . .?” and use the answers generated to craft additional “How might we” challenge statements. Place these ideas below the original.

  • When you have exhausted all ideas, prioritize the top three challenge statements that really get at the essence of the work. To help you prioritize, consider which challenge statements inspire the most innovation, and/or results in the greatest impact.
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    Empathize

    Empathy is the centerpiece of a human-centered design process. The Empathize mode is the work you do to understand people, within the context of your design challenge. It is your effort to understand the way they do things and why, their physical and emotional needs, how they think about world, and what is meaningful to them.


    - Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

    Define

    Generate a range of “How-Might-We . . .?” brainstorming topics that flow from your problem statement. These brainstorming topics typically are subsets of the entire problem, focusing on different aspects of the challenge.


    - Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

    Ideate

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    Prototype

    Build with the user in mind. What do you hope to test with the user? What sorts of behavior do you expect? Answering these questions will help focus your prototyping and help you receive meaningful feedback in the testing phase.


    - Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

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    Test

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    The NEED for Design Thinking...

    This movement to build a generation of design thinkers could not be more timely or more relevant. We are living in an age of increased complexity, and are facing global challenges at an unprecedented scale. The nature of connectivity, interactivity, and information is changing at lightening speed. We need to enable a generation of leaders who believe they can make a difference in the world around them, because we need this generation to build new systems and rebuild declining ones. We need them to be great collaborators, great communicators, and great innovators.


    - Excerpted from Design Thinking in Schools

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