Love Not Loss Case Study

Uma C, Vaibhav V, Alex Eason, Liz Pease

Extinct

Namibcypris costata

Namibcypris costata (common name not found)

Habitats

Namibcypris costata is commonly found on surface springs and freshwater due to its ability to live in underground water.

Species ecological roles (niche)

Ostracods primarily provide food to other organisms such as Cuspidariidae.

Species ecological roles (niche)

Ostracods primarily provide food to other organisms such as Cuspidariidae.

Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic)

The ostracods are species that have existed since the Ordovician time and (485.4 million years ago). There is a rapid decline in these ostracods.

Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

Unknown causes of extinction.

Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

A lack of available food sources for other species in the waters.

Rate of Loss (if Possible)

Not enough data was given in order to prove the rate of loss due the extinction of species in 1996.
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Critically Endangered

White-headed Vulture

Trigonoceps occipitalis

Habitats

White headed Vultures live most commonly in dry regions such as plains and deserts. And are also found in open savannas and thorn bush.

Species ecological roles (niche)

Categorized as top leveled consumers in the ecosystem.

Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic)

These vultures have a large amount of economic value as they are scavengers and are able to decompose bodies of dead animals at a rapid pace. Vultures speed up the process of decomposing and make it 3 times as faster than without them. The lack of vultures could increase the spread of disease from the corpses of these dead animals and it would cost a lot for the people to get treated for these diseases. The cost could be up to $1.5 billion.

Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

Loss of a population of medium sized mammals and habitat conservation that has reduced available land for vultures. Some accounts of posing as well, mostly indirect but some also related to poaching as well.

Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

Vultures are specialized scavengers that are essential to decomposing carcasses. One study in Kenya shows that the lack of vultures has tripled the amount of time it takes for a carcass to decompose. Economic benefits to the people included fast decomposition of animals in order to prevent the spread of diseases such as rabies from dead dogs. This would save people a lot of money as it an easy prevention from letting diseases spread.

Rate of loss (if possible)

Approximately 96%
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Being Conserved

White Rhinoceros

Ceratotherium simum

Habitats

White Rhinoceros are typically found in grasslands and savanna woodlands.

Species ecological roles (niche)

Primary Producers in Namibia ecosystem

Diet consists of grasses, leaves, fruits, trees and bushes.

Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic)

White Rhinoceros have high economic value due to their horn, which is often used in many uses of medicine and has a selling point of $3,000,000 USD. The rhino is also a symbol of senseless human greed, which is recognized by many hunters and poachers.

Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

A major cause for White Rhinoceros extinction is due to the great value of their horn. That is why these species are vulnerable to hunting and there are increasing rates of hunting and poaching for these species.

Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic)

The loss of the White Rhino will result in the loss of other species that the White Rhino interacts with and shares the same habitat with. Without the White Rhino there is also the not only the loss of mammals such as birds, reptiles, fish, and insects, but as well as plants. Also based more on an economic standpoint, the loss of the White Rhino will also result in less tourisms, rhinos are the second largest living land mammals, which is why the rhinos attract many tourists who bring money to national park and local communities.

Rate of loss (if possible)

Approximately 96%
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