Behavior/Cognitive Therapy

By: Nicole Richardson

Behavior Therapy

Behavioral therapy dates back to the 1950s and early 1960s. It concentrates on immediate behavior observation and the treatment of problematic behaviors. Behavioral therapy is used for such disorders as anxiety, those who are depressed, or those with a substance problem (Corey, 2013). One major area in behavioral therapy is called classical conditioning, which “refers to what happens prior to learning that creates a response through pairing.” (Corey, 2013, p. 248) . Another area is called operant conditioning, which is based on conduct that is affected by the outcome/ (Corey, 2013). “Behavioral therapists now use a variety of evidence-based techniques in their practices, including cognitive therapy, social skills training, relaxation training, and mindfulness strategies” (Corey, 2013, p. 247).


Reference

Corey, G. (2013). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy (9th Ed.) Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is based on what people think affects their behavior and emotions (Corey, 2013). According to the Mayo Clinic Staff (n.d.), "Cognitive behavioral therapy helps you become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking, so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way." (p. 1)

Reference

Corey, G. (2013). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy (9th Ed.) Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.


Mayo Clinic Staff (n.d.). Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Definition. Retrieved on March 9, 2015, from: http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/basics/definition/prc-20013594

Comparing Behavioral & Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Behavioral and cognitive behavior therapy both share the idea that a person's views and ideas can help to shape their conduct. Both therapies involve a therapist and a client. They both involve encouraging positive thoughts and conduct, with objectives in place and a continued evaluation (Corey, 2013). There is one major difference between the two therapies. Cognitive behavior therapy is based more on a person's emotions coming from their thoughts and perceptions. Whereas, behavior therapy is based on a person's concepts and perceptions affecting their behavior based on the outcome (Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, n.d.)

Reference

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (n.d.). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Retrieved on March 9, 2015, from: http://www.abct.org/Help/?m=mFindHelp&fa=WhatIsCBTpublic

Corey, G. (2013). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy (9th Ed.) Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Treatment for Procrastination

Procrastinating is putting something off, often times something significant. According to Dr. Sebastian Bailey (2014), research shows that "Complacency", "Avoiding discomfort", "Fear of failure", "Emotional state", and "Action illusion" are all factors as to why a person procrastinates (p. 1). A couple of things that Dr. Bailey (2014) suggests in helping with procrastination is "set goals and awards" and "Set creative punishments - negative consequences" (p. 1.). Behavior therapy relates to consequences from one's thoughts and conduct; therefore, this would be the best approach and treatment to help with procrastination (Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, n.d.).

Reference

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (n.d.). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Retrieved on March 9, 2015, from: http://www.abct.org/Help/?m=mFindHelp&fa=WhatIsCBTpublic

Bailey, S. (2014, August 29). 5 Fool-Proof Ways to End Procrastination Today. Retrieved on March 9, 2015, from: http://time.com/3210420/5-fool-proof-ways-to-end-procrastination-today/