Mapp V. Ohio

June 1961

Karla And Cara

Background

The police had intentions of searching the house of Dollree Mapp, who they believed had taken part in a bombing that was placed under the residence of Donald King. They forcefully entered her house, showing her a piece of paper that was never proved to be a proper search warrant. When they entered her house, they didn't find bombing information, but they did find child pornographic pictures and books, which were illegal in Ohio.

The Trial

The issue that was being confronted at the trial was whether or not the evidence, which was seized by the police, could be used against the defendant. However, there was a doubt on whether or not the information could be used because it was taken from her house without a proper search warrant. Because of the Exclusionary rule, the evidence could not be used against the defendant.

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The Verdict

The case had been initially taken to Ohio's Court, where she lost, and was sentenced to 1-7 years in the Ohio State Woman's Reformatory. However, Dollree Mapp appealed it,and it was then taken to the Supreme Court, where she won the case.(6-3)

Impact Today

This case helped insure that every defendant in a criminal case are given all rights as stated in the U.S Constitution. This case also gave the police limitations to what information they could use in court. The result of the case reinforced that police can't enter and search private property without a proper search warrant.

Bibliography

  • "Exclusionary rule." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2015. Web. 31 Aug. 2015.
  • "Mapp v. Ohio (1961)." Issues: Understanding Controversy and Society. ABC-CLIO, 2015. Web. 31 Aug. 2015.
  • "Mapp v. Ohio." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2015. Web. 31 Aug. 2015.
  • Scully, Leon. "Civil wrongs." National Review 25 May 1992: 22+. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 31 Aug. 2015.
  • "The Warren Court: 1953-1969." Flash Focus: U.S. Supreme Court. 135-153. US: Lakeside Publishing Group, LLC, 2005. History Reference Center. Web. 31 Aug. 2015.