Colts Chronicle

Carter Lomax Middle School

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Dates to Remember

All of October-Socktober Donations

10/17 Urban Air Back to School Bash Fundraiser

10/19 6th grade Texas A&M Field Trip - Team Rice

10/22-10/26 Red Ribbon Week

10/25 5th grade San Jacinto College Field Trip- Team U of H, UNT- C.Gonzalez

10/26 5th grade San Jacinto College Field Trip- Team Baylor, UNT- E. Gonzalez

10/30 5th grade San Jacinto College Field Trip- Team Texas Tech, UNT- Martinez

10/30 Chick-fil-A Spirit Night @ 5-8

10/31-11/01 Pumpkin Run

Coach's Corner

Lomax Volleyball

Our Lomax 5th graders had the week off for volleyball, but our 6th graders played three great matches on Wednesday at Sullivan. Lomax Black lost to Shaw Red and Lomax White lost to Sullivan each with one set to their opponent's two. But Lomax Red pulled out a victory against Shaw Royal two sets to one! All of the girls are learning a lot and improving their fundamental skills!
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TEXAS A&M FIELD TRIPS

Sixth grade Team Stanford, Team A&M, and Team UT travelled to College Station this week to visit Texas A&M University. Students toured the campus, learned about Aggie traditions, and saw dorm rooms. Team Rice will take their trip to A&M next Friday, October 19.
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Team Rice students are turning Focus Areas green!

Students on Team Rice are tracking the Focus Areas that they master during the month of October on a tree in their hallway. Each homeroom teacher on the team has their own color leaves and any time a student passes a power, additional, or challenge focus area, they put up a leaf!
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Socktober Collections Begin!

The Lomax Fundraising Club began picking up our Socktober donations today. Lomax students and staff are encouraged to donate new socks of any size for local families in need. We are collecting socks until the end of the month and students that donate a pair will get to wear crazy socks on October 31!
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Fall Dance

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RED RIBBON WEEK IS OCTOBER 22-26

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The spelling bee is coming up!

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Weekly Parent Connect


Befriending our feelings gives us the opportunity to make a choice to see things differently. When we are gripped by an emotion, our perception is narrowed significantly in order to support that emotion. "Whenever something doesn't work out the way you thought it would, instead of thinking that something went wrong, see it as something that went unexpectedly well, but for reasons that are not yet apparent." In other words, we can change our story.


The Adult Journey

Naming whatever it is you are feeling provides the opportunity to tame it and the choice to reframe it. The opportunity to choose different outcomes happens with the naming process, but the action itself requires we befriend the feeling we have named. Befriending our feelings can be difficult. When we allow ourselves to be aware of a feeling, we often attempt to keep it quietly off in the distance. In actuality, welcoming our feelings is the only thing that allows our feelings to move on. When we welcome our feelings it allows us to balance our life. We balance our nervous system, our personality and our lower and higher thinking centers of our brain. Our entire being is integrated which empowers us to move through life with grace and acceptance. In short, naming our feelings allow us to adapt to what life offers instead of fighting it.


Conscious Discipline Twist: What we resist persists. What we accept evaporates. We might have life themes or stories that are expressed as, “trust no one,” “being right equals being safe,” or “pleasing others equals love.” Whatever your story is, only the underlying feeling is true. Name the feeling, befriend it and get busy rewriting. Think of something in your life you find fearful at this moment. “Scared” might not be the word you would choose, so consider the many cousins of scared (concerned, worried, anxious). Imagine holding the feeling safely in your arms, keeping it in your back pocket or putting it in your purse as you go about your day. Simply allowing the feeling to be with you until its integrative work is done is the gift of the feeling.

This applies to kids by responding to the underlying message of the child’s emotion first, then addressing the behavioral needs of the situation.


Anger and Frustration’s message is someone or something is getting in my way. When a child pushes another child off the chair, choose to address the theme of the feeling instead of saying, “Was that nice? What is our rule about pushing?” You might say, “You wanted a turn with the computer and didn’t know the words to use. When you want a turn, tap Erin on the shoulder, call her name and say, ‘Erin, I would like a turn on the computer.’”


Happiness and Calm’s message is about extending and sharing. When a child is excited about the lizard she found, choose to address the theme instead of saying, “Don’t bring that thing in this house! It’s great you found it but you are scaring it to death. Go put it back outside.” You might say, “What a find! Tell me about it as we work together to keep the lizard safe.”


Awareness is the key to regulation. The entire process teaches us a new way to handle or perceive the original trigger.


*This discussion is based on Becky Bailey’s new book: Managing Emotional Mayhem and adapted from Larry Slocum’s School Family Minute.



Parent coordinator/5th grade counselor,

Tara Crum

Tcrum@pasadenaisd.org

6th grade counselor/bilingual

Cynthia Pena

cpena@pasadenaisd.org

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Parent Connect


You will be receiving an email from Summit Learning inviting you to login to the platform and see your student's information. Having your own Parent Connect account allows you to view your child's goals for the week, current grades, and dues dates for Focus Areas, Projects, and Concept Units.


When you receive the email from Summit Learning, you will only need to follow the link, watch the video, and create your own password for the account. If you do not receive an email, contact your child's homeroom teacher.