Outstanding Owls

Monthly Newsletter

March

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Marching into Spring!

WOW! We have learned so much in February! Fractions have been tough, but my students are very determined to be successful! Thank you for all your support at home! Make sure to keep up to date on my NEW Google Site!

This Month in Math!

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Mastering Fractions!

We have a lot to cover this third nine weeks; even more than the last nine weeks! We will be diving head first into fractions! Here are your Common Core State Standards for Fractions!


Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.A.1

Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.A.2

Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

Build fractions from unit fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3

Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.A

Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.B

Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. Examples: 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8 ; 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8 ; 2 1/8 = 1 + 1 + 1/8 = 8/8 + 8/8 + 1/8.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.C

Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.D

Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having like denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.4

Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.4.A

Understand a fraction a/b as a multiple of 1/b. For example, use a visual fraction model to represent 5/4 as the product 5 × (1/4), recording the conclusion by the equation 5/4 = 5 × (1/4).

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.4.B

Understand a multiple of a/b as a multiple of 1/b, and use this understanding to multiply a fraction by a whole number. For example, use a visual fraction model to express 3 × (2/5) as 6 × (1/5), recognizing this product as 6/5. (In general, n × (a/b) = (n × a)/b.)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.4.C

Solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, if each person at a party will eat 3/8 of a pound of roast beef, and there will be 5 people at the party, how many pounds of roast beef will be needed? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?

Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.C.5

Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.2For example, express 3/10 as 30/100, and add 3/10 + 4/100 = 34/100.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.C.6

Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. For example, rewrite 0.62 as 62/100; describe a length as 0.62 meters; locate 0.62 on a number line diagram.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.C.7

Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual model.



Remember: Fractions will be a HUGE part of our end of the year assessment (EOG). PLEASE keep in touch with me so your student will not get behind!! Feel free to email me with any questions at all! I have been a slacker on our homework help page. I will be sure to work on keeping it up o date!

Mrs. Arrowood's Homebase

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Thank you to all the parents who helped with our Class Dojo Party earlier in February. It is always so fun to celebrate our good behavior!



We are still working on our class read aloud Wonder. We are just head over heels for this book!! Make sure you ask your child about it!



We will be starting our next writing assignment this month. It will be a Narrative piece! This is my favorite one to read because they are always SO creative!


We will be going on a Field Trip this month! The destination is still a surprise!

4th Grade Happenings

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March 5- Math Test

March 11- First day of Tutoring 3:00-4:00

March 18- Tutoring 3:00-4:00

March 21- Hiking Club Hike

March 25- Tutoring 3:00-4:00

March 26- Field Trip

March 27- End of Grading Period (may change)

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