Indoor Air Pollution

By: Sadie Smith

Affect on health

Bad indoor air quality has recently been becoming more and more common in homes and other buildings and is becoming a larger problem. Poor indoor air quality or pollution can bother your nose, throat, and eyes. It can also cause chronic heart and lung problems like cancer, etc.

Environmental Issues

About 3 billion people cook and heat their homes using solid fuels like wood, charcoal, coal, dung, crop wastes on open fires or traditional stoves.Cooking and heating practices like this make high levels of household indoor air pollution which includes a range of health damaging pollutants like fine particles and carbon monoxide. So many people are becoming sick and dying from indoor pollution because they are mostly uneducated and don't have the money or resources to fix these problems in their own homes.

Preventing Indoor Pollution

  • Adopt a smoke-free home. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General)

  • Install a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector near bedrooms and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall.

  • Vacuum carpets often to remove allergens that trigger asthma attacks and allergic reactions.

  • Test your home for radon gas. If levels are above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action level, take steps to reduce those levels. (EPA)

  • Have gas appliances professionally installed, vented outside, and checked annually for carbon monoxide leaks.

  • Never run cars, lawnmowers and other combustion devices inside the garage. Always operate a safe distance from windows and doors.

  • Properly ventilate rooms with high humidity, such as bathrooms, kitchens, and basements, to prevent moisture buildup and mold.

How to recycle and reuse

  • Limit purchases to necessary products
  • Purchase environmentally preferable products
  • Consider using products to the full extent of their useful life
  • Share materials and equipment with coworkers and friends
  • Identify and promote recycling programs at work and in your community

Sources

Works Cited

"Chapter 5: Indoor Air Pollutants and Toxic Materials." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 08 Dec. 2009. Web. 06 Apr. 2015.

"Chapter 5: Indoor Air Pollutants and Toxic Materials." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 08 Dec. 2009. Web. 08 Apr. 2015.

"Clean Household Energy Can save People's Lives." WHO. World Health Organization, Mar. 2014. Web. 16 Apr. 2015.

"Household (Indoor) Air Pollution." WHO. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2015.

"Indoor Air Quality." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 May 2014. Web. 14 Apr. 2015.

"Recycling." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 09 Dec. 2014. Web. 14 Apr. 2015.