The Lottery

by Shirley Jackson - Angelina Rodriguez & Taylor Schwall

Theme

Following the crowd can have disastrous consequences.


If you get in and start hanging out with a bad group of people, you're just going to have traditions that can lead to something that can cause an accident or even turn something into a disaster.

Thesis Statement

In the crazy, yet adventurous short story, "The Lottery," author Shirley Jackson shows how traditions can be disastrous in one's life.

Text Evidence #1

In the story, "The Lottery," by Shirley Jackson states, "Mr. Summers spoke frequently to the villagers about making a new box, but no one liked to upset even as much tradition as was represented by the black box" (Jackson, 1). Due to tradition that has been around ever since the village was created, the black box has always been apart of the village for the lottery that they do every year on June 27th at 10 o' clock in the morning.

Text Evidence #2

In the story, "The Lottery," by Shirley Jackson states, '"Be a good sport, Tessie,' Mrs. Delacroix called, and Mrs. Graves said, 'All of us took the same chance"' (Jackson, 4). This quote shows how Tessie doesn't agree with the town on how her family has to draw a slip of paper to see which family member is going to be declared as the winner of the lottery. People are saying to her that it was kind of just the luck of the draw, everyone's husbands or sons had to pick and everyone took the same chance in which another family could have gone through the same thing.

Text Evidence #3

In the story, "The Lottery," by Shirley Jackson states, '"It isn't fair, it isn't right,' Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her" (Jackson, 5). Mrs. Hutchinson get's all worried about her family "winning" the lottery because the whole town knows what's going to happen to only one person in the family. Mrs. Hutchinson is also saying "It isn't fair" because she thinks that her husband wouldn't have picked the ticket if he got more time.

In Summary

Therefore in this crazy, yet adventurous story, "The Lottery," author Shirley Jackson shows how traditions can be disastrous in one's life. Jackson uses many characters to describe how a tradition had been in their village for a long time and how they continue to go on with it. The tradition consist of someone bringing a black box up with enough blank pieces of papers for the husbands or sons to choose, but one less with a black dot on it. Someone starts calling names and the males go up and choose a paper for their family. If the paper has a black dot on it, your family has to draw again and one family member with the black dot on it, "wins" the lottery.