Multicultural Read Aloud

"I Have a Dream" by Martin Luther King Jr

Mrs. Doshier and Miss Bell's Kindergarten classroom

Big image

Vocabulary

Dream

--Noun - a series of thoughts, images, and sensations occurring in a person's mind during sleep.

--Verb - think about doing something or that something might happy.


Freedom

--Noun - The power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without being told they cannot do that.

"I Have a Dream" by Martin Luther King Jr.

On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation's history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson's magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike. The themes of equality and freedom for all are not only relevant today, 50 years later, but also provide young readers with an important introduction to our nation's past.
I Have A Dream by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. paintings by Kadir Nelson
Big image

About the Author

Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was a clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the American civil rights movement. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Prize for his work to end racial segregation and discrimination through nonviolent means.

About the Illustrator

Kadir Nelson is a naturally gifted artist whose extraordinary talent continues to develop and be discovered. Before the age of 30, Nelson had already illustrated children's books, sold paintings to celebrities, and worked on a movie directed by Steven Spielberg.

Nelson received the 2012 Coretta Scott King Award for writing and illustrating Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans.

Awards and Recognition

Entertainment Weekly, December 5, 2012:


"This picture book stands a notch above others thanks to Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson's beautifully rendered and sincerely moving paintings."

School Library Journal Best of Children's Books 2012

Publishers Weekly Best of Children's Books 2012

Kirkus Reviews Best of Children's Books 2012

Starred Review, School Library Journal, November 2012:
“Even after 50 years, this seminal address still has the power to move listeners, and this handsome illustrated version will be welcomed in all collections.”

Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, September 24, 2012:
“A glorious interpretation of a bedrock moment in 20th-century history.”

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2012:
“An award-winning artist captures the passion and purpose of this most notable 20th-century American speech in beautifully realized oil paintings…. A title for remembrance and for re-dedication to the dream."

Evaluation Criteria for Multicultural Children’s Literature

Portray cultural accuracy and authenticity of characters-‘insiders’ as authors of literature

Be rich in cultural details

Honor and celebrate diversity

Instructional Sequence

-I need everyone sitting in their carpet square spots. Thank you so much for sitting in your spots.

-Our conversation level should be at a level 0 unless Miss calls on you when your hand is raised to ask a question.

-You should not need any help because I need you to be listening.

-When you hear our key words "freedom" and "dream" I want you to use this finger (shows index finger) and touch your nose like this (touches nose)

-We are sitting criss cross applesauce hands in our laps unless we are touching our noses.

-When we do touch our noses when we hear what words? (freedom and dream) I will know we are participating.

-We are successful when we are listening and Miss Bell doesn't have to ask us to be quiet.

-What do you think this book is about? (Call on 3 students)

-Can someone tell me what the title of the book is? (1 student.)(Same student) How did you know that?

-What is a dream? (Call on student)

-Read book. Touch nose when viewing the words "dream" and "freedom".

-At the end of the book "What was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream? (4-5 students)

-What was your favorite part of the book> Why was that your favorite part? (3-4 students)

-When Miss Bell says your table color, I want you guys to go back to your seats and draw a picture of you and a friend who looks different than you doing something together. -Why do you think I am having you draw someone different than you?

-Rememeber your friend has to look different than you and you have to be doing something together.

-When you are done you can set your picture on the back table and get your agenda out and get ready to go home.

-Call table colors

Questions During Reading

1. What do you think this book is about?

2. Can someone tell me what the title of the book is? How did you know that?

3. What is a dream?

4. What was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream?

5. What was your favorite part of this book? Why was that your favorite part of the book?

Ending Activity

When Miss Bell says your table color, I want you guys to go back to your seats and draw a picture of you and a friend who looks different than you doing something together.

Reflection

Overall I believe the lesson went well. The students got back from music and I instructed them to sit on their carpet spots on the floor. We had a sub because Mrs. Doshier had to leave because she got sick, I was a little disappointed but obviously made it through. I was CHAMPSing the lesson and right after I explained our conversation level should be at a 0 unless we raise our hands and Miss Bell call's on us, I had one of my kids shout out "When are we going to have snack?!" I told him to move his car, and his car was on red so sadly, he had to go sick in the safe seat during my read aloud.


I think the book was too high for my kindergartners, There were words in there they just couldn't comprehend yet. If there was a way to make the speech more relatable to children I would like to do that. I could tell it really moved one of my students though. M was constantly engaged, and I think he could really see himself reflected him the book with the small African American children. It was so sweet.


I absolutely loved my ending activity and the pictures that came from that! I could tell just by looking at their pictures what their developmental level was. One was really detailed with the two playing basketball, another girl took a picture from the book of the kids holding hands in a circle and made that her picture, while one of my low students drew circles with arms all around the body. I planned to attach some at the end of my flyer, but I left them at my apartment in Wichita and I am at my parents in Sedan. I will bring them the next time we have class.


Next time I want to be even better prepared. My eyes definitely needed to be on my students the whole time, and I felt that even though I had read the book a few times prior, it still wasn't enough. But as I said earlier, overall, the first lesson was a success.