Chicken Pox

By: Megan Ries

What is Chicken pox?

Chicken pox is a skin condition that causes red blisters on skin, and weakens the immune system. You can have the virus for up to month and as short as just 1 week. Chicken pox effects people of all ages.

History

The chicken pox virus was first found in Italy in the early 1500's. In the year 1682 a French man named the virus Chicken Pox because of the red blisters found on the skin of patients.

Symptoms

Most commonly found symptoms reported among patients include a small-grade fever, red blisters on skin, decreased appetite, and constant headache. The blisters can be found around your abdomen, upper arms, neck, back, legs, and even throat. The blisters cause rash and itchiness.

Treatment

One treatment option for chicken pox includes rubbing calamine lotion on blisters until they crust and heal. Other options for chicken pox treatments include cutting nail to prevent itching, isolation from others, and one last thing you can do is simply get vaccinated.

Statistics

Around 50 blisters on skin is common for a healthier person infected. In severe cases up to 10,000 blisters can be on your skin. Before the vaccine was invented four million people were infected from chicken pox every year. More than 150 people have died from the chicken pox virus.

Complications with Chicken Pox

Chicken pox weakens the immune system permanently. The longer you are infected with the virus the weaker your immune system gets. A a women is infected with chicken pox while she is pregnant there is a very high chance that the baby will have birth defects.
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Prevention

To prevent the spread of chicken pox you must stay isolated from others who don't have the virus because it is highly contagious. Patients are not infected once the blisters crust and heal. To make sure you don't get chicken pox keep a distance from those who have the virus.

Similar diseases

Only one disease is very similar to chicken pox, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is not found in the same places in the world but similar symptoms may occur, such as red bumps and blisters on skin

Transmittion of chicken pox

Chicken pox spreads through a herpes virus called Varicella Zoster. It is found in airborn droplets released from blisters.

All about Vaccination

The only vaccine currently available for chicken pox is a shot containing the live but weakened Varicella Virus. The vaccine is called the Varivax shot. A lot of controversy has arisen about the vaccine. As more and more children get vaccinated it seems that more children are diagnosed with autism disorder. Other concerning things that have been reported after getting vaccinated are pneumonia, nerve pains, eye inflammation, and seizers. The vaccine has been proven to cure chicken pox but does cause other medical problems listed above. America is the number one country that has the vaccine. Other countries that are supplied with the vaccine include Europe,Japan, and South Korea. Others countries refuse to use the vaccine because they dont trust America and they think we are harming them.

Bibliography

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