Color of Our Worlds March 2020

Educating ALL Students for Success!

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SATISFACTION AND ENGAGEMENT SURVEYS LAUNCH FOR STUDENTS, PARENTS AND EMPLOYEES

As part of its continued commitment to educating all students for success, the Martin County School District has launched its annual Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys, which provide stakeholders the opportunity to give feedback on their level of satisfaction and engagement with school- and District-based programs, outreach efforts, initiatives and resources.


The Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys were designed by a committee of educators and parents as a tactic of the Success Plan, the strategic planning document which outlines, guides and informs the District’s strategies for achievement across four key areas: student success, employee success, culture of collaboration and financial stability.


Teachers, students, administrators, staff and parents are encouraged to complete the surveys, which will be compiled by Instructional Services staff and distributed to schools and departments to help inform practices and create school improvement goals.


“The ability to gather and synthesize feedback from all stakeholder groups is key to our school district’s mission of educating all students for success,” Superintendent Laurie J. Gaylord shared. “The annual Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys provide us with important insight about things we are doing well and areas which will require continued focus in our quest to become a dynamic educational system of excellence. I encourage all students, parents and employees to take a few moments to provide their invaluable feedback through their completion of this year’s surveys.”


The Satisfaction and Engagement Surveys launched Monday, February 24, 2020, and are accessible through both the District’s website and each school’s website. The surveys will close April 17, 2020.


Parents who have children enrolled in more than one school are encouraged to complete the parent survey for each school.

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Dr. David L. Anderson dedicated his life to education, for 40+years. He was the 1st African American elected to serve on the local school board. Anderson Middle School in Stuart was named in his honor. His long legacy of service is a cherished part of Martin County’s history.
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35th Annual Russell Holloway Elementary Track Meet

Title I Schools Place Well at Meet

The 35th Annual Russell Holloway Elementary Track Meet was held Saturday, February 8, 2020, at South Fork High School.


Teams of elementary student-athletes competed before a packed house of parents and community spectators in four individual events - 50- and 200-meter dashes, the long jump and softball throw- as well as 4x100 and 4x400 relays.


The District sends a huge round of applause to all of our elementary athletes, coaches and volunteers, with a special congratulations going out to this year's winners:


Cheryl Hubbard Sportsmanship Trophy- Port Salerno Elementary School



1st Place Girls- J.D. Parker Elementary School

1st Place Boys- J.D. Parker Elementary School


Combined Overall

3rd Place- Pinewood Elementary School

1st Place- J.D. Parker Elementary School (8th consecutive year!)

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J.D. Parker Elementary placed 1st overall in the district for the 7th year in a row!

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Angie Gilbride of Warfield Elementary School is 2020 MSCD Assistant Principal of the Year

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Science Fair Awards

These young scientists are going to the state fair. The middle school students are Broadcom Masters!
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Liani Brown - Indiantown Middle School Student wins Art in the Capitol Competition

The artwork will hang in the State Capitol for the upcoming legislative session before taking up residency in the School Board building.
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Congratulations Katie Frank of Hobe Sound Elementary School for winning the Behind the Badge Award for the Tag Art Contest!

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Parent Resources

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DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME 2020

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Daylight Saving Time starts on the 2nd Sunday in March—that’s Sunday, March 8, 2020!

WHAT IS DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME?


Daylight Saving Time (DST) is the practice of moving the clocks forward one hour from Standard Time during the summer months, and changing them back again in the fall. The general idea is that this allows us all to make better use of natural daylight. However, DST has many detractors—and rightfully so.

Note that the term is “Daylight Saving Time” and not “Daylight Savings Time” (with an extra “s” at the end of “Saving”), though many of us are guilty of saying it the wrong way! The technical explanation is that the word “saving” is singular because it acts as part of an adjective rather than a verb.


WHEN IS DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME IN 2020?


To remember which way to set their clocks, folks often use the expression, “Spring forward, fall back.”

  • Daylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 8, 2020 at 2:00 A.M. On Saturday night, set your clocks forward one hour (i.e., losing one hour) to “spring ahead.”
  • Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, November 1, 2020, at 2:00 A.M. On Saturday night, set your clocks back one hour (i.e., gaining one hour) to “fall back.”

Note: Since the time changes at 2:00 A.M., we generally change our clocks before bed on Saturday.

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME DATES

(In the U.S., the exceptions to DST are Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.)

YearDaylight Saving Time BeginsDaylight Saving Time Ends

2020Sunday, March 8 at 2:00 A.M.Sunday, November 1 at 2:00 A.M.

2021Sunday, March 14 at 2:00 A.M.Sunday, November 7 at 2:00 A.M.

2022Sunday, March 13 at 2:00 A.M.Sunday, November 6 at 2:00 A.M.

2023Sunday, March 12 at 2:00 A.M.Sunday, November 5 at 2:00 A.M.


THE HISTORY OF DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME


WHY DID DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME START?


Blame Ben? Benjamin Franklin’s “An Economical Project,” written in 1784, is the earliest known proposal to “save” daylight. It was whimsical in tone, advocating laws to compel citizens to rise at the crack of dawn to save the expense of candlelight:


Every morning, as soon as the Sun rises, let all the bells in every church be set ringing: and if that is not sufficient, let cannon be fired in every street to wake the sluggards effectually… . Oblige a man to rise at four in the morning, and it is probable that he will go willingly to bed at eight in the evening.”


DST’S TRUE FOUNDER?


The first true proponent of Daylight Saving Time was an Englishman named William Willet. A London builder, he conceived the idea while riding his horse early one morning in 1907. He noticed that the shutters of houses were tightly closed even though the Sun had risen. In “The Waste of Daylight,” the manifesto of his personal light-saving campaign, Willet wrote, “Everyone appreciates the long, light evenings. Everyone laments their shrinkage as the days grow shorter; and nearly everyone has given utterance to a regret that the nearly clear, bright light of an early morning during Spring and Summer months is so seldom seen or used… . That so many as 210 hours of daylight are, to all intents and purposes, wasted every year is a defect in our civilization. Let England recognise and remedy it.”


Willet spent a small fortune lobbying businessmen, members of Parliament, and the U.S. Congress to put clocks ahead 20 minutes on each of the four Sundays in April, and reverse the process on consecutive Sundays in September. But his proposal was met mostly with ridicule. One community opposed it on moral grounds, calling the practice the sin of “lying” about true time.


WORLD WAR I LED TO ADOPTION OF DST


Attitudes changed after World War I broke out. The government and citizenry recognized the need to conserve coal used for heating homes. The Germans were the first to officially adopt the light-extending system in 1915, as a fuel-saving measure during World War I. This led to the introduction in 1916 of British Summer Time: From May 21 to October 1, clocks in Britain were put an hour ahead.


The United States followed in 1918, when Congress passed the Standard Time Act, which established the time zones. However, this was amidst great public opposition. A U.S. government Congressional Committee was formed to investigate the benefits of Daylight Saving Time. Many Americans viewed the practice as an absurd attempt to make late sleepers get up early. Others thought that it was unnatural to follow “clock time” instead of “Sun time.” A columnist in the Saturday Evening Post offered this alternative: “Why not ‘save summer’ by having June begin at the end of February?”


The matter took on new meaning in April 1917, when President Woodrow Wilson declared war. Suddenly, energy conservation was of paramount importance, and several efforts were launched to enlist public support for changing the clocks. A group called the National Daylight Saving Convention distributed postcards showing Uncle Sam holding a garden hoe and rifle, turning back the hands of a huge pocket watch. Voters were asked to sign and mail to their congressman postcards that declared, “If I have more daylight, I can work longer for my country. We need every hour of light.” Manhattan’s borough president testified to Congress that the extra hour of light would be a boon to home gardening, and therefore increase the Allies’ food supply. Posters chided, “Uncle Sam, your enemies have been up and are at work in the extra hour of daylight—when will YOU wake up?”


With public opinion in its favor, Congress officially declared that all clocks would be moved ahead one hour at 2:00 A.M. on March 31, 1918. (Canada adopted a similar policy later the same year.) Americans were encouraged to turn off their lights and go to bed earlier than they normally did—at around 8:00 P.M.


(Retrieved from https://www.almanac.com/content/when-daylight-saving-time#.)

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School Happenings

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Indiantown Middle School students are celebrating Black History Month by learning about historical artwork! Do you recognize any of these pieces or artists?

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Family Fun Night at Anderson Middle School

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PSE Stingrays Cheer Seniors!

Port Salerno Elementary School students went to brighten the lives of seniors and home-bound residents in our community this Valentines Day! The Stingrays' cards and notes were delivered to in Stuart.
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Kindergarten Patriotic Performance at SeaWind Elementary!

The Kindergarten Patriotic performance at SeaWind Elementary School was awe inspiring! So proud of Rhett and his best bud - friends since 8 weeks old in daycare. Check out the socks!
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Another fun Empatico.org chat with our friends in Minnesota! A poetry slam was held to share the poetry our SeaWind Dolphins wrote. Students talked about how they found inspiration in everyday objects that matter to them. So much fun making connections across the country!
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When the neighbors ask you to come over for a Valentines dance, you show up and dance! Pinewood Elementary School students enjoyed sharing the love with residents at the Symphony of Stuart senior living facility last week.
Pinewood Elementary Students Celebrate Valentines Day at Symphony of Stuart

Anderson Middle School Chorus Sings "Mary Had a Little Lamb" at School Board Meeting!

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Genius Hour at Anderson Middle School!

Another great Genius Hour! Students were learning about 3D printing, scanning and making some REALLY cool stop motion animations!

What is Your Why?

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Eve Samples got some very important correspondence in the mail from Pinewood Elementary students! Students brightened her first week as Executive Director of Friends of the Everglades with their postcards!
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Building relationships with ELL families
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Community Resources

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Martin County School District Title I Schools and Program Staff

Elementary Schools:

 Hobe Sound Elementary

 JD Parker Elementary School

 Pinewood Elementary School

 Port Salerno Elementary School

 Seawind Elementary School

 Warfield Elementary School


Secondary Schools:

 David Anderson Middle School

 Indiantown Middle School

 Spectrum Academy

 Willoughby Learning Center


Title I Program Staff


Shela Khanal, Director of Title I Programs

khanals@martin.k12.fl.us


Debra George, Coordinator of Title I Programs

georged@martin.k12.fl.us


Deb Stull, Coordinator District Title Programs: ELL, Immigrant, and FIT

stulld@martin.k12.fl.us


Casey Vasko, Federal Programs/ Equitable Services Liaison

vaskoc@martin.k12.fl.us


Yvonne Blanco, Title I Department Secretary

blancoy@martin.k12.fl.us

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