GEORGE WASHINGTON

HOW HE CROAKED

Brief Bio

FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES


Born: Westmoreland County, Virginia

February 22nd, 1732


Died: Mount Vernon, Virginia

December 14th, 1799


67 years old

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Significance

George Washington is one of the largest name in American history. During his life time he accomplished many great things. One example would be become the first president, even though he was unanimously chose, because the people seen him as a great father figure for this country. He also was general for Americans in the revolutionary war and was elected the head of the Continental Congress in 1774.

Timeline of his Ingury

For a long time Washington had several different infections in his mouth, causing him to loose all his teeth and making him have to eat baby food because he could no longer chew.


December 14, 1799: Washington woke up that morning gasping for air and could not seem to breathe. A doctor came and performed bloodletting and blister-beetles.


Later that day: Washington had no signs of getting any better so the doctors near met up and continued giving him the basic treatments of bloodletting and blister-beetles. They also tried giving him calomel and tartar emetic which made Washington puke and poop instantly and continuously.


Late that night: Washington died at the age of 67.

Disease

During Washington's time, no one practiced proper hygiene. Over time peoples teeth would rot to the point were they would fall out. This was very painful and most people did not have access to medical care so they would have to just suffer through the process of losing their teeth. Since Washington was the president, he had access to medical care, but it was not the best. For a while Washington suffered through the pain not needing a doctor. He wore dentures, but he wouldn't eat and could barely talk with them in. One morning Washington woke up gasping for air in pain. His wife, Martha, and his secretary sent for a doctor. In the mean time they gave him molasses, vinegar, and butter to try to open his throat up. They also soaked a rag in smelling salt and put it on his neck. This was suppose to help bring down the swelling. Once Martha and his secretary got some help they practiced bloodletting which I steadying of helping Washington only made him worse because it made him weaker. After a couple of times of bloodletting Washington still wasn't feeling better so they had to perform the blister-beetle treatment, where they crushed up poisonous beetles and rubbed them on his neck, which cause hustlers filled with pus and they drained them hoping it would relieve some of the pain from Washington. At this point Washington became weak and could no longer continue with the pain and told them to let him go but they continued performing the bloodletting method and the blister-beetle treatment. He died later that night.

Medicine/ Treatments: How it was Treated then and Now

Then:

- bloodletting

- made him drink molasses, vinegar, and butter

- wrapped a rag soaked in smelling salt around his neck

- blister-beetle treatment: crushed up poisonous beetles and rubbed them on his neck, which created blisters that the doctor would pop and drain the pus from

- wheat-bran poultices

- calomel

- tartar emetic

Now:

- hospitalization is required and antibiotics are given to help the person breath

Vocabulary

carbuncles: A type of skin infection that involves hair follicles; forms lumps under the skin filled with pus


surveyor: A person who surveys usually people who survey the land.


poultices: soft moist material that was applied to body parts to relieve soreness and inflammation


epiglottitis: an infection on the flap of skin at the back of the tongue that protects your windpipe


calomel: a chemical that causes someone to throw up