China

By: LaShawn Carter

Facts About China

Who's lives in China? Chinese people

What's the average income of China? The average annual household income in China, converted to dollars, was $10,220

What's the climate of China? In China, a vast land spanning many degrees of latitude with complicated terrain, climate varies radically. China has a variety of temperature and rainfall zones, including continental monsoon areas. In winter most areas become cold and dry, in summer hot and rainy.

What's the tourism of China? China's long history has left many cultural relics and the title of "China Top Tourist City" has gone to the first group of 54 cities. The Great Wall, a symbol of the Chinese nation, is also a prime example of historical sites that have become major tourist attractions.

China's Pop Culture. Most of China TV is largely controlled by Central China Television. They show all types of different shows ranging from reality or variety shows to historical or romantic dramas.

What kind of government do China have? Communism. China is a single-party republic ruled by the Communist Party.

Facts about their history? China was never Communist, it was Socialist, but now it's basically a single party, part socialist, part capitalist, authoritarian/ totalitarian oligarchy with figurehead leaders.

The Great Wall of China. The best-known and best-preserved section of the Great Wall was built in the 14th through 17th centuries A.D., during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Though the Great Wall never effectively prevented invaders from entering China, it came to function more as a psychological barrier between Chinese civilization and the world, and remains a powerful symbol of the country’s enduring strength.

A Famous Person of China? Jackie Chan is from Hong Kong is an actor, martial artist, film director, producer and singer. In his movies, he is known for hisacrobatic fighting styles, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts, which he typically performs himself. Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 150 films.

Famous tourist attractions in China. The Great Wall of China, The Forbidden City, Terracotta Army and Temple of Heaven

Famous Food in China. Sweet and Sour Pork, Gong Bao Chicken, Ma Po Tofu, Wontons, Dumplings and Chow Mein.

Orange Chicken Ingredients

For the chicken:
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, patted dry and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese Shaoxing wine or dry sherry
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • About 2 cups canola oil for frying
For the orange sauce:
  • 2 oranges
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger (from 1-inch piece)
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese Shaoxing wine or dry sherry
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar (not seasoned) or cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Thinly sliced scallion greens, for garnish
  • Thinly sliced fresh red chile, for garnish (optional)
  • Cooked rice for serving

Orange Chicken Directions

Start the chicken:
In a shallow, medium bowl toss the chicken pieces with the soy sauce and wine. Let stand while you make the sauce.

Make the orange sauce:
Using a vegetable peeler, remove 4 lengthwise strips of zest from 1 orange—each strip should be about 3/4 inch wide and 3 1/2 to 4 inches long. Arrange the zest in one layer between paper towels and microwave on high in 20-second increments until dry and brittle but not browned, 60 to 80 seconds total. Let the zest cool then finely chop it. If desired, use a Microplane to remove some of the remaining zest from the orange and reserve it for garnish. (If desired, zest the second orange for additional garnish.)

Squeeze enough juice from both oranges to measure 1/2 cup. In a small bowl, whisk together the juice and 2 teaspoons cornstarch until the cornstarch is dissolved.

In a 10-inch skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking. Add the garlic, ginger, crushed red pepper, and dried orange zest and stir-fry until golden, about 30 seconds. Add the soy sauce, wine, vinegar, and sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves, about 5 seconds. Stir the orange juice–cornstarch mixture then add it to the skillet. Bring the sauce to a boil, stirring, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute. Remove the skillet from the heat and set it aside while you fry the chicken.

Fry the chicken:
Line a large rimmed baking sheet with paper towels.

In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, heat 1/2 inch of oil until a deep-fry thermometer registers 365°F. Meanwhile, coat half of the chicken, a couple pieces at a time, in cornstarch, making sure they are well coated and gently knocking off any excess, then transfer to a plate. Carefully add all the coated chicken to the hot oil, spacing the pieces apart from each other. Fry the chicken, turning it once or twice, until deep golden, about 5 minutes. While frying, adjust the heat as necessary to keep the oil at 365°F. Using a metal spider or a slotted spoon, transfer the chicken as done to the paper-towel-lined baking sheet. Continue to coat and fry the remaining chicken in the same manner, returning the oil to 365°F between batches.

Once the chicken is fried, place the skillet of reserved orange sauce over moderately low heat and bring it to a simmer, stirring and thinning the sauce with a little water if necessary. Add the chicken, and stir until thoroughly coated in sauce.