Canberra

The house of representatives

The House of Representatives , known as the people's house, is where government is formed. It has 150 members, and the party or parties able to gain the support of the majority of the House form government. The House's other roles are to debate proposed laws, watch over government expenditure, including through its committee system, and to provide a forum for public debate on issues of national importance.

Questacon

Questacon is an interactive science centre that opened in September 1980. It was developed by Professor Mike Gore, a physics lecturer from the Australian National University. Professor Gore went on to become the founding Director of Questacon.

Questacon's current building was Japan's gift to Australia for the 1988 Bicentenary and it was opened on 23 November 1988. Japanese government and business contributed ¥1 billion, half of the capital cost of A$19.64 million.[1] Questacon was formerly housed at the old Ainslie Primary School.

As of 3 December 2007,[2] Questacon is a part of the Australian Government Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. The director is Professor Graham Durant. Questacon's vision is "a better future for all Australians through engagement with science and innovation".[3]

War memorial

The Australian War Memorial is Australia's national memorial to the members of its armed forces and supporting organizations who have died or participated in the wars of the Commonwealth of Australia. The memorial includes an extensive national military museum. The Australian War Memorial was opened in 1941, and is widely regarded as one of the most significant memorials of its type in the world.

The Memorial is located in Australia's capital, Canberra. It is the north terminus of the city's ceremonial land axis, which stretches from Parliament House on Capital Hill along a line passing through the summit of the cone-shaped Mount Ainslie to the northeast. No continuous roadway links the two points, but there is a clear line of sight from the front balcony of Parliament House to the War Memorial, and from the front steps of the War Memorial back to Parliament House.

Australian mint

The Royal Australian Mint is a coin mint (opened 1965) situated in the Australian federal capital city of Canberra, in the suburb of Deakin. All new Australian circulating coins are minted at the Royal Australian Mint.

Before the opening of the Australian mint, Australian coins were struck at branches of the Royal Mint - the Sydney Mint, Melbourne Mint and Perth Mint. The Royal Australian Mint is the first mint in Australia not to be a branch of the Royal Mint in London. The only other operational mint in Australia is the Perth Mint.

High court

The High Court of Australia is the supreme court in the Australian court hierarchy and the final court of appeal in Australia.[1] It has both original and appellate jurisdiction, the power of judicial review over laws passed by the Parliament of Australia and the parliaments of the States, and the ability to interpret the Constitution of Australia.

The High Court is mandated by Constitution section 71, which vests in it the judicial power of the Commonwealth of Australia. The Court was constituted by, and its first members were appointed under, the Judiciary Act 1903. It now operates under Constitution sections 71 to 75, the Judiciary Act, and the High Court of Australia Act 1979. It is composed of seven Justices: the Chief Justice of Australia, currently Robert French, and six other Justices. They are appointed by the Governor-General of Australia, on the advice of the federal government, and must retire at age 70.