Nike Child Labor

Nike and Their Child Labor Problems.

Nike uses child labor.

On October 19, 2001, after being accused for so many years, Nike finally admitted to using child labor to make there products. Almost half of the worlds Nike soccer balls are made in Pakistan. But there made by kids who are 6-7 years old or maybe younger. That's were Team Sweat makes an attempt to step in. Team Sweat is one of the largest groups in the world that tracks and protests against Nike products. One of the people on Team Sweat, is Jim Keady, on May 25 2011, he said, "If Nike feels confident that workers are being paid a fair wage, why are they afraid of making this information public?" When a CBS news team reported a story on it, 15 women were hit in the head by there supervisor, and 45 were made to sit on there knees with there hands up for 20 minutes. They also noted that "There are many inhumane working conditions that these workers have to deal with while working. For example, workers are not allowed to go to the bathroom more than once per eight hour shift, and they can't drink water more than twice per shift. It is also very common for workers to faint from exhaustion, heat, fumes, and poor nutrition while they are working." That is why Nike for many years was known as a very bad company to buy things from.

Slave of Nike

In the winter of 2001, I became a victim of slavery in the garment industry in Los Angeles. I was an easy target for my trafficker: I was a desperate mother who had just lost my baby because I didn't have the money to take her to the hospital when she got sick.

After my baby died, I got so depressed and worried that what happened to my baby could happen to my other three children. I was taking sewing classes in hopes of starting my own business and earn enough money to take care of my children.

My sewing teacher was approached by a trafficker because she knew a lot of women who knew how to sew and would be desperate to come to the United States to make money. There were no opportunities in my town, so when my sewing teacher told me about the opportunity to go to the U.S., I was definitely interested.

How the problem was solved

To help solve the labor problem, Nike CEO Phil Knight, decided he was going to fix the problem. So he started to lay off a lot of his workers and raised wages. As he did so he aggressively made changes to his multi million dollar company. Also, he said that he will put in air cleaners to insure clean air for Nike employees. With that, that is how Nike fixed its labor problems.

Pictures

Map

This map shows what countries send Nike products to other countries, obviously they all go to the U.S.
Website 1

"'We Blew It': Nike Admits to Mistakes Over Child Labor." Common Dreams. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.

Website 2

Nisen, Max. "How Nike Solved Its Sweatshop Problem." Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 09 May 2013. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.

Citations

"TED Case Studies." NIKE and Child Labor. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.

"Enslaved for 40 Days." Cc. N.p., n.d. Web.

Nisen, Max. "How Nike Solved Its Sweatshop Problem." Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 09 May 2013. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.

"'We Blew It': Nike Admits to Mistakes Over Child Labor." Common Dreams. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.