Career Exploration Newsletter

Manufacturing, Engineering, Science & Technology

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October is Manufacturing Month!

Held annually on the first Friday in October with events that continue throughout the month, MFG Day—Manufacturing Day—helps show the reality of modern manufacturing careers by encouraging thousands of companies and educational institutions around the nation to open their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders. As manufacturers seek to fill 4 million high-skill, high-tech and high-paying jobs over the next decade, MFG Day empowers manufacturers to come together to address their collective challenges so they can help their communities and future generations thrive.

This year, MFG Day also includes a strong emphasis on engaging digital and virtual events throughout the country. With manufacturing careers at the heart of some of the most impactful work being done in response to the pandemic we are excited to shine a spotlight on manufacturing careers.

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Dominic Guidetti

CAREER CONNECTIONS

NORTHWESTERN LOCAL SCHOOLS

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Northwestern has another student beginning his career journey while still a senior in high school. Dominic Guidetti, a current senior engineering student at Northwestern High School, started his pre-apprenticeship program with Schaeffler USA at the beginning of this school year. Dominic has been in the engineering program for all four years of high school and is currently working on his senior capstone project with fellow classmate Ryan Walter. Dominic has done an exceptional job throughout his high school engineering pathway and the opportunity to take part in the pre-apprenticeship program with Schaeffler USA will help catapult his career to the next level. After graduation, Dominic plans on attending the University of Akron to pursue an engineering degree while completing the apprenticeship program with Schaeffler USA. These career opportunities for students have allowed students to take the skills and tools that they have learned in the engineering classroom and apply them in real-world situations. The real-world experiences combined with the classroom skills have been a catalyst for Northwestern graduates to continue to excel beyond the school walls. As always, Northwestern is looking to expand the engineering opportunities for our students. At our next STEM Advisory Meeting, we will be discussing the possibility of additional internship opportunities with other area businesses.

ROBOTICS AT NORTHWESTERN LOCAL SCHOOLS

This last month in 7th-grade Robotics students were designing and building a solution to the problem of creating a spinning sign for a business that spins slowly and is able to be turned off from inside the shop. The students not only had to apply their knowledge of mechanisms that allows for a decrease in speed but then use V5 code to program the motors and sensors. Students were acting as mechanical engineers where they built the prototype, electric engineers filled out the schematics and wiring page, and finally, software engineers created the code. Students then move on to the next project of coding a stoplight that will turn red if a button is pressed to allow for an emergency vehicle to pass through. Then, an autonomous vehicle is used in a military setting to carry supplies through a dangerous battlefield while straddling a line to avoid IEDs. Finally, a robotic arm can pick up materials from a shelf and place them on a pallet to be moved out of a warehouse.

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CAREER CONNECTIONS - TRIWAY

At both Shreve and Wooster Township Elementary, students have been engaged in a variety of STEAM challenges. STEAM is a 45-minute special class that students in Kindergarten through sixth grade attend once per week. Learning objectives are currently focused on the Engineering Design Process, coding, and robotics. Class discussions revolve around the application of acquired STEAM skills to future career pathways and opportunities.
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Kindergarten and first-grade students are currently learning the basics of coding through the use of Bee-Bots. Bee-Bots are easy-to-use robots that help students learn to sequence, problem-solve, and code. Their goal is to navigate the Bee-Bots through a “pumpkin patch” by coding the Bee-Bot to correctly find their 3D printed pumpkin.
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Second, third, and fourth-grade students are learning about the Engineering Design Process while creating apple wrecking balls, pumpkin stands, and pumpkin catapults. Students who are creating the catapults learn kinesthetically about simple machines, energy, as well as forces and motion. They will compete against their peers in a “pumpkin chunkin” contest to see who’s pumpkin goes the farthest. The winner gets to print their very own pumpkin with the 3D printer.
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Fifth graders are developing their knowledge of robotics through the use of VEX IQ sets. These sets were acquired for the district through a grant from TC Energy. Students are in the process of creating earthquake simulators with VEX. Upon completion, they will use the engineering design process to build structures that can withstand the simulator.
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Sixth-grade students are also working on robotics through the use of Sphero robots. Students will create a “corn maze” that they will work to accurately navigate the robot through. These amazing STEAM leaders enjoy the integration of technology with engineering and innovation. The Triway STEAM initiative allows students to explore and learn through cross-curricular, hands-on experiences. STEAM opens the door for ingenuity and connections to future career skills.
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The advanced manufacturing workforce of the future — right here in Northeast Ohio.

Forget everything you think you know about manufacturing. Today, companies make things using robots, 3D printers, artificial intelligence, and more to build the future in safe, clean, cutting-edge manufacturing facilities. These jobs of the future require skills of the future, which is why more than 2,000 modern manufacturing jobs are open in Northeast Ohio alone. Our local community colleges are the region's greatest asset in providing the training, technical skills, and other important support services for the future workforce.

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Stark State College is your full-service workforce training partner!

As your workforce training partner, we provide:

  • Hundreds of low cost, professionally led training course options in both credit and non-credit formats
  • Registered Apprenticeship, Industrial training, and customizable employee skill training options available
  • Access to education and training from stark State’s highly credentialed and industry seasoned faculty
  • Variety of educational schedule and delivery options: onsite at your location, online, or one of Stark State’s convenient locations
  • Over 40 years of partnering with business and industry to produce in-demand value added skill sets for students

Please visit our website or contact us directly at 330-494-6170. For non-credit or general workforce, click here. For Engineering or Industrial Technology or apprenticeship programming, click here.

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Is Engineering In Your Future?

Looking at lists of hard-to-fill positions, engineers of all kinds always seem to be at the top though engineering also tops lists of best-paid professions. Yet, unfortunately, not many students are studying to enter the engineering field. Says ACWHCC Engineering and Design Technology instructor, “Often students think they have to be geniuses to be an engineer, but engineering is not about memorizing facts, passing tests, and regurgitating information. My students learn scientific concepts and I pose real-world problems that they must tackle using critical thinking, a willingness to try new things, and an ability to learn from their mistakes. They need to be hard-working, creative, and most importantly, be able to bounce back from failure.” went on to say, “Most of the highest paying jobs in Ohio are directly related to engineering – students in this field are extremely fortunate.”

The manufacturing arena offers a myriad of job possibilities for trained engineers and Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center’s Engineering and Design Technology program is preparing students to be the well-paid workers of tomorrow. Students who complete the program requirements will end their high school career with industry credentials that will serve them well in the workplace.

Says Career Center Superintendent, Mike Parry, “Our manufacturing-related programs were developed with input from local industry employers and they are designed to enable students who complete the requirements to hit the ground running when they leave us. I encourage high school students to investigate and visit to learn more about the good things that are happening in our Engineering and Design Technology program and in our Robotics and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Educational Collaborative (RAMTEC) lab.” For more information visit the district’s website at www.acwhcc.org, click High School/Programs/Engineering Technology and Design. Or contact the Career Center at 419-289-3313 or email cheyneyr@acwhcc.org for more information.

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Engineering
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National Disability Employment Awareness Month

In October, Americans observe National Disability Employment Awareness Month by paying tribute to the accomplishments of the men and women with disabilities whose work helps keep the nation’s economy strong and by reaffirming their commitment to ensure equal opportunity for all citizens.

This effort to educate the public about the issues related to disability and employment began in 1945, when Congress enacted Public Law 176, declaring the first week of October each year as National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week. In 1962, the word “physically” was removed to acknowledge the employment needs and contributions of individuals with all types of disabilities. Some 25 years later, Congress expanded the week to a month and changed the name to National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

Vocational Rehabilitation Helps People with Disabilities Find or Keep a Job

OOD’s Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation and Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired provide vocational rehabilitation services to eligible Ohioans with disabilities. With employment services like job coaching, vocational rehabilitation can help people with physical, intellectual, mental health and sensory disabilities to get a job or keep the job they have now. To learn more or find out if you might be eligible, take this online self-assessment.

Teens 14 and older who have a disability can also get support as they transition from high school into college or work. Transition teams work with students to develop activities and experiences designed to provide new skills to help them reach their post-secondary goals.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Career Connections

Tri-County Educational Service Center

741 Winkler Drive

Wooster Ohio 44691


Contact:

Beth Gaubatz (tesc_bgaubatz@tccsa.net)

Ann Hendershot (tesc_ahendershot@tccsa.net)