Mexican Revolution

Introduction

The Mexican Revolution happened in 1910, but the whole event started in 1884 when Porfirio Diaz became president. When in power he sold off, if not all, then most of the natural resources that were in Mexico. These exploited resources were oil, mines, copper fields, and land space. This lead to the rise in the economy for Mexico's country, however, it only benefited a limited amount of people. Diaz wanted to be like a white European and that affected his vision in raising his country and their own and not a European one. Since this is what Diaz wanted, he made the upper class even more rich. The downside as seen by the cientificos "that the only problem keeping Mexico from being as great as any European country was that it had so many poor people." (Pbs.org) Eventually, Madero, who lost elections to Gonzalez, wrote a book going against Diaz's beliefs and saying what was really happening. This sparked a revolution in Mexico. The revolution made a 'balance' in money between the classes. This revolution is also looked as the Mexican Civil War.

Who really started the Mexican Revolution?

There are many factors to the start of the Mexican Civil war, but it is mostly known as the Mexican Revolution. Porfirio Diaz is a possible answer and arguably the main cause. Diaz made many changes to stay in power, not only did he intimidate the people to vote for him, but he changed the Mexican Constitution to give himself more time as president. This lead to smaller reasons that started the war. Madero lost

Biblography/ OPVL

“The Mexican Revolution.” The Mexican Revolution. Web. 22 Sep. 2015. <http://www.historytoday.com/alan-knight/mexican-revolution> This website helped me find background research on the Mexican Revolution. It helped me by connecting my main topic to what was happening around the war. However, it didn't give me much information on the effects of foreign power towards the war. I trust this site, not because it has information of the war, but it matches information of many websites. This mutual information makes me think that it can be trusted, given the fact that many places also bear the same facts.


“Mexican Revolution.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 22 Sep. 2015. <http://www.history.com/topics/mexican-revolution> This website helped me find names for guerrilla leaders. It did not give me much information on the Revolution itself and gave vague dates. Although, it did not have much information about the war, I trust this website because it is an official page of information and also has a television channel that displays informative shows.


"Feature Mexican Revolution." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 10 Nov. 2015.

<http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/feature/mexican-revolution/> The origin of the website is from PBS.org. I think that this website is useful because, like History.com, it is known by television watchers as an informative source. The purpose in which this website was created was to give a slight insight of the Mexican Revolution. The value of this website is that it shows us a little bit of information on my topic. The limitation of this website is the lack of detail in its synopsis of the revolution.