Gopher Gazette

GPHS Counseling Services Newsletter

GPHS Counseling Services

Serving students with last names A - Br:

Stacy Parker-Brown

972-809-5768

Stacy.parker-brown@gpisd.org

She has 17 years of experience in education, 6 as a school counselor. She has been in GPISD for 5 years but this is her first year at GPHS.

Bachelor of Business Administration, Marketing from Northwood University

Masters of Education, Secondary School Counseling from University of North Texas

“Do not go where the path may lead, instead go where there is no path and leave a trail!”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson


Serving students with last names Bu - Fe:

Twila Read

972-809-5776

Twila.read@gpisd.org

She has 22 years of experience in education, 5 as a school counselor. She has been in GPISD 22 years, this is her first year at GPHS.

Bachelor of Arts from University of Texas at Arlington

Masters of Education from Lamar University

“Whatever you are be a good one." -Abraham Lincoln

I am very excited to be at GPHS and look forward to meeting all of my students


Serving students with last names Fi - Hern:

Danielle Townsend

972-809-5763

Danielle.townsend@gpisd.org

She has 22 years of experience in education, 16 as school counselor. She has been in GPISD for 4 years and this is her 4th year at GPHS.

Bachelor of Arts, Elementary Education from Dillard University of New Orleans

Masters of Science, Counseling from Texas A & M University of Commerce, TX

“Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me." -Carol Burnett


Serving students with last names Herr - Mar:

Stephanie Satcher

972-809-5742

Stephanie.satcher@gpisd.org

She has 8 years of experience in education and 11 years in counseling. She has been in GPISD for 4 years all at GPHS.

Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Science from Delta State University

Masters of Education in School Counseling & Educational Specialist in School Counseling from Delta State University

“Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving.”


Serving students with last names Mas - Pere:

Sherry Burton

972-809-5722

Sherry.burton@gpisd.org

She has 21 years of experience in education, 18 as a school counselor. This is her first year in GPISD and here at GPHS. She come to us from Dallas ISD where she was for 20 years.

Bachelors of Science in Counseling from Texas A & M University – Commerce

Masters of Education in School Counseling from Dallas Baptist University

“Happiness is a choice! I choose to be happy.”


Serving students with last names Perk - Sa:

Rhona Rosenthal

972-809-5741

Rhona.rosenthal@gpisd.org

She has 22 years of experience in education, 19 as a school counselor. This is her 22nd year in GPISD and her first year at GPHS.

Bachelors in Science from Texas Woman’s University

Masters of Science from University of Texas at Arlington

“For every minute you are angry you lose 60 seconds of happiness.”

I am excited to be at GPHS!


Serving students with last names Sc - Z:

Melissa Gaitan

972-809-5714

Melissa.gaitan@gpisd.org

She has 22 years of experience in education, 2 as a school counselor. She has been in GPISD 2 years, all at GPHS.

Bachelor of Arts in Cross Cultural Missions- Southwestern Assemblies of God University

Bachelors of Fine Arts in Visual Studies- University of North Texas

Masters of Counseling- Lamar University

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's learning to dance in the rain."


And our campus Social Worker, serving ALL students is:

Gwen Sanders

972-809-5878

Gwendolyn.sanders@gpisd.org

She has two years of experience as a School Social Worker. This is her first year in GPISD and at GPHS.

Bachelor of Social Work from Texas Christian University

Masters of Social Work from Texas Christian University

“Be kind to yourself so you can be happy enough to be kind to the world.”

Your SENIOR YEAR game plan – what you need to know and do

Your senior year of high school is the most crucial time in the post -secondary planning process. You will decide which colleges and universities to apply to, perfect college essays, explore financial aid and scholarship opportunities. Remember to keep your grades up and have a great year. Be sure to visit our College and Career Center.



Here are a few things to get you started during the months of September and October:


  • Log in and explore your Naviance account (www.gpisd.org/naviance) to access online college and career readiness resources.
  • Attend the GPISD COLLEGE NIGHT on September 20, 2018 held here at GPHS
  • Review ACT/SAT scores and decide if you need to re-test to meet college admission requirements
  • Complete your college applications at least 1 week before the deadlines
  • Request recommendation letters at least 3 weeks in advance from coaches, teachers or community leaders who will give you a positive recommendation
  • Request a writing conference with English teacher for critique of your scholarship essays
  • Attend Financial Aid Night on your campus October 9, 2018 to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA opens October 1st)
  • Complete the Dallas County Promise Pledge – www.dallascountypromise.org
  • Research scholarship opportunities and start applying for scholarships
  • Be sure to talk with your counselor and college advisor about your plans after high school (Your GPHS counselor will begin having senior chats throughout the month of September)
https://youtu.be/gUis5lityCQ

Student Athletes

NCAA Eligibility Center & NAIA Eligibility Center
https://youtu.be/EESsxHO1NmE

The NCAA: Division I, II, III

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.


What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.


What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.


What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.


What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.


What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.


During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.


What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.


What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.


www.ncaa.org

https://youtu.be/GP-_dlTHISE

Informational for Student Athletes @ GPHS

Tuesday, Oct. 2nd, 6:30pm

101 Gopher Boulevard

Grand Prairie, TX

GPHS Counselors will inform GPHS athletes about NCAA and NCIA eligibility.

Suicide – 2nd leading cause of death for teens: What are the warning signs of suicide and how to respond

(Sept 10th – 17th is National Suicide Awareness Week)


A suicidal person may not ask for help, but that doesn't mean that help isn't wanted. People who take their lives don't want to die-they just want to stop hurting. Suicide prevention

starts with recognizing the warning signs and taking them seriously. If you think a friend or family member is considering suicide, you might be afraid to bring up the subject. But talking

openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life.


Suicidal warning signs

Talking about suicide - Any talk about suicide, dying, or self-harm, such as "I wish

I hadn't been born," "If l see you again ... " and "I'd be better off dead."

Seeking out lethal means - Seeking access to guns, pills, knives, or other objects that could be used in a suicide attempt.

Preoccupation with death - Unusual focus on death, dying, or violence. Writing

poems or stories about death.

No hope for the future - Feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and being trapped ("There's no way out"). Belief that things will never get better or change.

Self-loathing, self-hatred - Feelings of worthlessness, guilt, shame, and self-hatred. Feeling like a burden ("Everyone would be better off without me").

Getting affairs in order - Making out a will. Giving away prized possessions. Making arrangements for family members.

Saying goodbye - Unusual or unexpected visits or calls to family and friends. Saying goodbye to people as if they won't be seen again.

Withdrawing from others - Withdrawing from friends and family. Increasing social isolation. Desire to be left alone.


What to do if concerned about suicide?

Tip 1: Speak up if you're worried. Don't

be afraid to ask questions. Allow the

person to express feelings and listen. Be

supportive, let them know you care.

Tip 2: Respond quickly in a crisis Call

911 if in immediate danger. . The suicide

hotline# is 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Tip 3: Offer help and support

• Get Professional Help

• Follow up on treatment

• Be Proactive

• Encourage a positive lifestyle change

• Make a safety plan

• Remove any access to guns, knives, pills, etc

• Continue support over the long haul


GPHS Counseling Services will be promoting Suicide Awareness & Prevention during the week of September 10, 2018. Resources will be provided.

Free Community Workshops offered by the City of GP

Teens and their parents are invited to join professionals as they share advice on how to start difficult conversations as their relate to life choices and social interactions. Below are the topics that will be covered and on what date.

Sept 13th – Healthy Relationships

· Professionals from Texas Health Resources will be providing tips for identifying unhealthy signs in romantic relationships as well as friendships

Sept 20th – LGBTQA and What It All Means

· In this open Q & A with Dallas Resource Centers, teens and parents can ask questions in relation to gender identity in an evolving world and learn more about available resources.

Sept 27th – What if College Isn’t for Me?

· This program will offer a chance for students and parents to learn about trade schools, Gap year, military and other options if a traditional college or four year university isn’t their path. Representatives from different organizations will be available to speak with directly following the program.

And then on TUESDAY September 25th for ADULTS from 6:30 – 8:30pm at the main library EXPERIENCE DYLEXIA.

· Hands on experience of the difficulties and frustrations that people with dyslexia encounter daily. Registration required. https://bit.ly/2KJnZQO

October is Bully Prevention Month and Red Ribbon Drug Prevention Week

Bullying Prevention Resources for Parents - Warning signs

According to StopBullying.gov, bullying is unwanted, aggressive

behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived

power imbalance. Behavior is considered bullying if it materially and

substantially disrupts the educational environment and/or infringes on

the rights of another student(s) at school.

Parents play a key role in preventing and responding to bullying. It is

important to talk with children who show signs of being bullied or

bullying others. These warning signs can also point to other issues or

problems, such as depression or substance abuse. Talking to the child

can help identify the root of the problem.

SIGNS A CHILD IS BEING BULLIED:

· Unexplainable injuries

· Lost or damaged clothing, books, electronics, jewelry

· Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking illness

· Changes in eating habits, like suddenly skipping meals or binge eating. May be hungrier than usual when get home from not eating lunch at school

· Difficulty sleeping or having nightmares

· Declining grades, loss of interest in school work, not wanting to go to school

· Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations

· Feelings of helplessness or low self esteem

· Self destructive behaviors like running away, harming oneself, or talking about committing suicide

SIGNS THAT A CHILD IS BULLYING OTHERS:

· Get into verbal or physical fights

· Have friends that bully others

· Are increasingly aggressive

· Get sent to the principal's office or to detention frequently

· Have unexplained extra money or new belongings

· Blame others for their problems; Don't accept responsibility for their actions

· Are competitive and who worry about their reputation or popularity

· Lack empathy/compassion for others

How to Prevent Bullying

Parents, school staff, and other caring adults have a role to play in preventing bullying. They can:

• Help kids understand bullying. Talk about what bullying is and how to stand up to it safely. Tell kids bullying is unacceptable. Make sure kids know how to get help.

• Keep the lines of communication open. Check in with kids often. Listen to them. Know their friends, ask about school, and understand their concerns.

• Encourage kids to do what they love. Special activities, interests, and hobbies can boost confidence, help kids make friends, and protect them from bullying behavior.

• Model how to treat others with kindness and respect.