11th Grade Summer Reading

Sparkman High School

Ap English 11 Summer Reading

Students in AP English 11 will be required to read two books over the summer


Everyone must read

Columbine by Dave Cullen


For the second book, students may choose between the following three titles:

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

Life is So Good by George Dawson and Richard Glaubman

The Color of Water by James McBride

Assignment

Read BOTH books

(Columbine and your choice of the other three titles)

BEFORE the first day of class.


On the first day of class, you will receive your summer reading assignment

along with detailed instructions about how to complete the work.


The assignment will be an interactive, online assignment.

If you do not have access to a computer or the internet,

you MUST let your teacher know on the first day of class.

You will have approximately one week to complete the assignment

once it is given to you.


**Note**

Please complete your reading BEFORE the end of the summer and come to class prepared. While the assignment itself can be easily completed in one week, reading both books and completing the assignment would be very difficult.

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English 11: Optional Summer Reading and Extra Credit Project

Questions? e-mail Mrs. Neis at: kneis@ madison.k12.al.us


Due Date: First Day of Class


Step One: Choose any of the following novels and read it over the summer:


I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou, The Pact by Jodi Picoult, The Color of Water by James McBride, As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Night by Elie Wiesel, or The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.


Step Two: Choose ONE of the following projects, complete it, and turn it in on the first day of class.


Step Three: Write a brief paragraph on a separate piece of paper, explaining what grade you think you deserve on this project and why.


Additional Notes:


This project is a test grade. However, should this grade eventually lower your overall average, it will be dropped.


For choices 2 and 3, you should write 2-3 pages (double spaced, size 12, Times New Roman font).


Even though certain projects may really appeal to you, remember to make sure the project you choose will work well with the novel you read.


A scoring guide is provided at the end of this assignment.


1. Children's Story


Turn the novel you read into a children's story by retelling the plot in a simple way with vocabulary appropriate for youngsters. Make sure your creation looks like a children's book, complete with a hard cover, an appealing book jacket with the title and author, and colorful illustrations above and below your writing. DO NOT use lined paper, and make sure all writing is either typed or written neatly with a black marker.


2. Write Your Own Scene


Write a scene that could have happened in the book you read, but didn't. Be sure to write in the same style as the author. On a separate page, include a brief explanation of what has occurred up until this point in the novel and give a general description of the characters. In a second paragraph, explain why you made the changes you did and how they would have affected the outcome.


3. Rewrite the Ending


If you did not care for the way your book ended, here is your opportunity to change it. Rewrite a new ending to the book you read. Be sure to write in the style of the author.


DO NOT explain how the ending should be changed. Write as if you were writing the story. On a separate page describe the original ending and the changes you made and then explain why you made these changes. Include a copy of the last three pages of the novel you read.


4. Model of the Setting


If the place where the story takes place is a significant part of the story, create a model of the setting. Create your model in either a large box, on a piece of cardboard or piece of wood. Be sure to make it as realistic as possible. Include many details in your model which demonstrate events that occur in the novel you read. You may also want to include characters from your novel on the model you create. Label each place. On a piece of paper, write at least a one page description of the setting and its significance to the rest of the story.


5. Graphic Novel


Create a graphic novel based on the novel you read. It should have an illustrated cover with the title and author, and be comic book size. Inside, retell the story using dialogue and descriptions of the setting and characters. Put your writing in bubbles. Create colorful illustrations that help tell the story.


Projects adapted from:


http://www.spencerportschools.org/files/576/Book%20Report%20Projects.doc


Scoring Guide


A Project


The project reflects student's insight and creativity, as well as reflects application of critical thinking. Information is clearly focused and in an organized and thoughtful manner. The student has followed all directions and fulfilled, and perhaps gone beyond, all requirements. The project is impeccably neat, with easy-to-read fonts, writing, and/or graphics. Writing (where applicable) has no or very few grammatical/mechanical mistakes.


B Project


The project reflects student's insight and creativity, as well as reflects application of some critical thinking, though less work and thought than an A project. Information is generally focused and in an organized and thoughtful manner. The student has followed most directions and fulfilled most requirements. The project is neat, with easy-to-read fonts, writing, and/or graphics. Writing (where applicable) has some grammatical/mechanical mistakes.


C Project


The project does not adequately reflect student's insight and/or creativity, or adequately reflects application of critical thinking. The project may seem haphazard and/or disorganized. Information is not well focused or in an organized and thoughtful manner. The student has followed some/most directions and fulfilled some/most requirements. The project lacks neatness. Writing (where applicable) has many grammatical/mechanical mistakes.


NC= No Credit


The project does not adequately reflect student's insight or creativity, nor does it reflect application of critical thinking. The project is haphazard and/or disorganized. Information is not well focused or in an organized and thoughtful manner. The student has followed some directions and fulfilled some requirements. The project lacks neatness. Writing (where applicable) has many distracting grammatical/mechanical mistakes.

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