Significant Statistical Findings

USA and Japan

Land to People in the United States to Japan

The statistical findings of difference between the United States and Japan through Arable Land, the Total Land Area, and population, is significantly varied and proves to the world how different foods may be consumed based upon those findings.

How do arable land, total land area, and population influence what people eat in Japan and the US?

Arable Land:

The amount of arable land that a country has local access to influences what they eat because, of their ability to grow crops and it also affects the amount of foods that are not grown on a farm.

Total Land Area:

The total land area that a country has influences what they eat because, if a country does not have a whole lot of land, then they have less land to grown crops on and less land to create a civilization to feed.

Population:

The population of a country influences what they eat because, it dictates the amount of food needed to be hunted, gathered, and/or grown. Moreover, if a country has a larger population, then they have more mouths to feed and are pressured to hunt, gather, and/or grow more. But if a country has a smaller population, then they don't feel as pressured to be constantly hunting, gather, and/or farming.

Obesity

The obesity rate of a country is of relevance because, it proves how much access that country has to food, and how they are taking advantage of it. In addition, it shows what their diet is and what foods they choose to eat, individually and as a whole.

Obesity Rates

Japan:

Obesity Rate - 5%


United States:

Obesity Rate - 33%

Works Consulted

Albaba, Ken. Food Cultures of the World. Vol. 3. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Japan. Follett Shelf. 2011. Web. 11 Sept. 2013.


Ashkenazi, Michael, and Jeanne Jacob. Food Culture in Japan. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2003. Web. 11 Sept. 2013.


Central Intelligence Agency. "'Japan' Central Intelligence Agency." The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency, 2011. Web. 17 Sept. 2013.


Central Intelligence Agency. "'United States' Central Intelligence Agency." The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency, 2011. Web. 17 Sept. 2013.


Ember, Melvin, and Carol R. Ember. Countries and Their Cultures. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2001. Print.


"Japan Boosting Homegrown Food." Cayman Islands Cay Compass News Online RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Sept. 2013.


"Japan: Country Overview." World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, 2013. Web. 17 Sept. 2013.


"Standard of Living in Japan." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 17 Aug. 2013. Web. 18 Sept. 2013.