Senior Books

What will you read next?

Pride and Prejudice

The Book is written by Jane Austen.
Well, the book is fun. It doesn't take itself too seriously and, in fact, the characters (particularly Mr. Bennet) spend a lot of time pointing out that people and social customs are pretty silly, and if people just said what they felt, we'd probably be better off, except for the times it happens and ends badly. In other words, Jane Austen wrote comedy. It's cleverly disguised as romantic, coming of age, stories about gossipy women going to dances in hopes of snagging a man, but don't fall for it. It's not about those things any more than a James Bond movie is about geopolitics.
Big image

The Way of The World

Written by William Congreve.
Big image
The Way of the World is a play written by the English playwright William Congreve. It premiered in early March 1700 in the theatre in Lincoln's Inn Fields in London. It is widely regarded as one of the best Restoration comedies and is still occasionally performed. At the time, however, the play struck many audience members as continuing the immorality of the previous decades, and it was not well received.
Big image

The Horse's Mouth

Wrote by Joyce Cary


The Horse's Mouth is a 1944 novel by Joyce Cary, the third in his First Trilogy, whose first two books are Herself Surprised (1941) and To Be A Pilgrim (1942). The Horse's Mouth follows the adventures of Gulley Jimson, an artist who would exploit his friends and acquaintances to earn a quid, told from his point of view, just as the other books in the First Trilogy tell events from their central characters' different points of view. Cary's novel also uses Gulley's unique perspective to comment on the social and political events of the time.

Big image
Big image

Macbeth

Wrote by William Shakespeare


Macbeth (full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. Set mainly in Scotland, the play dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. The play is believed to have been written between 1599 and 1606. The earliest account of a performance of what was probably Shakespeare's play is April 1611, when Simon Forman recorded seeing such a play at the Globe Theatre.

Big image
Big image