Civil Rights Movement

By Jaron Kroplin

The Civil Rights Movement - Previous & Current

Introduction

The African-American Civil Rights Movement main goal was to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans. It lasted from 1954 to 1968. It caused riots, deaths, and town destruction throughout the South. Leaders ascended from the South to try and help stop the racial segregation between the whites and blacks. People such as Martin Luther King Jr. , Rosa Parks, and Malcolm X put effort into helping. Some leaders might not live.


Forms of protest and civil disobedience included boycotts such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-56) in Alabama. Sit-ins such as the Greensboro sit-ins (1960) in North Carolina. Marches such as the Selma to Montgomery Marches (1965). There was also a wide range of other nonviolent activities that were used. Lives were taken in the movement that all men are created equal.

Tactics & Strategies

The Civil Rights Movement (1954-1968) was a movement to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans. It was a time of racism and segregation. People rose to power and became leaders in this movement. They used a numerous amount of tactics and strategies throughout the movement that were effective. The most effective tactics and strategies were civil disobedience and boycott. These were best because it caused the most heads to turn.


One of the most effective tactics used in the Civil Rights Movement was civil disobedience. Civil disobedience is the use of non-violent actions to disrupt state activity. No matter the cause the people wouldn't fight back. The most famous example of civil disobedience is Rosa Parks' story. Rosa Parks refused to move on the bus when a white man tried to take her seat. Although 15-year old Claudette Colvin had done the same thing nine months earlier, Parks' action led directly to the Montgomery Bus Boycott. It was one of the most famous acts in history.


Another effective tactic used in the Civil Rights Movement was the Boycotts. Boycotts is the use of non-violent actions to disrupt state activity. Boycotts were used to stand up to whites in a non-violent, but effective way.The Bus boycotts in Montgomery is a example. Blacks were arrested for refusing to surrender their seats to a white person. It became such a big deal that it led to a United States Supreme Court decision that declared the Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses to be unconstitutional. Many important figures in the Civil Rights Movement that took part in the boycott, including Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and Ralph Abernathy.


Overall, innocent lives were taken in the painful years of the Civil Rights Movement. The Civil Rights Movement was a movement to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans. It was a thing many thought might never end, but luckily it did. Groups were formed and people rose to power. Rich history and famous events were created. African-Americans used different strategies and tactics when going about how to end it. The most effective tactics and strategies were civil disobedience and boycott. The reason they were the best is because it was the most successful in ending racial segregation and discrimination.

Organizations Of The Civil Rights Movement

NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) - An African-American civil rights organization in the United States formed in 1909. It's purpose was "to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination". The NAACP's headquarters is in Baltimore, with other regional offices in California, New York, Michigan, Colorado, Georgia, Texas and Maryland. As of 2007, the NAACP had approximately 425,000 paying and non-paying members. They played a major role in the involvement of the civil rights movement.Though other civil rights groups emerged in the 1950s and 1960s, the NAACP stayed Though other civil rights groups emerged in the 1950s and 1960s, the NAACP stayed a important role in the movement, helping organize the 1963 March on Washington, and successfully persuading for legislation that resulted in the 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Act. Considered one of the "Big Four" civil rights organizations.


CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) - A U.S. civil rights organization that played a pivotal role for African-Americans in the Civil Rights Movement. Founded in 1942, CORE was one of the "Big Four" civil rights organizations, along with the SCLC, the SNCC, and the NAACP. Even though it still exist, the CORE has been much less influential since the end of the 1955–68 civil rights movement. They were a mixed race organization consisting of blacks and whites. The CORE became one of the leading activist organizations in the early years of the Civil Rights Movement. In the early 1960s, CORE worked with other groups to launch a series of plans. The Freedom Riders, aimed at desegregating public facilities, the Freedom Summer voter registration project, and the historic 1963 March on Washington. The CORE started out as a non-violent approach to end racial segregation, but by the late 1960s the group shifted its focus towards black nationalism and separatism.

Leaders Of The Civil Rights Movement

Martin Luther King Jr. - Born on January 15, 1929 and assassinated April 4, 1968, in the effort to stop racial segregation in the South. Martin was a American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and a key leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Martin is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using non-violent tactics based upon Christian beliefs. On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for acting in the non-violent matter. He is also very well known because of his famous "I have a dream speech" that took place at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. There are monuments and a holiday made after him in acknowledgement for what he has done. After his death, riots broke out all over the United States in response. It was one of the biggest days in the Civil Rights Movement as it sparked a fire for others.


Malcolm X - Born on May 19, 1925 and died February 21, 1965. Malcolm was an American Muslim minister and a human rights activist. He was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African-Americans in history. He had a rough early life as he was orphaned as a young child, his father died when he was six, and his mother was placed in a mental hospital. He died at the age of 39 by multiple gun shot wounds. Malcolm X excelled in junior year of high school but dropped out after a white teacher told him that practicing law, his aspiration at the time, was "no realistic goal for a black people". Later Malcolm X recalled feeling that the white world offered no place for a career-oriented black man, regardless of their talent.