Digital Learning Day at OVCS

March 13, 2015

What is Digital Learning?

When technology is used to strengthen a student's learning experience, digital learning is at work. Technology doesn't do students' work for them, and it doesn't eliminate the need for teachers. It does, however, give students access to more courses, richer content, new kinds of resources, and a variety of classroom experiences. Digital learning is also available to families and community members who benefit from technology-driven communication and resources designed with them in mind.

Why Celebrate Digital Learning Day?

OVCS practices more technological innovation than some districts twice our size. We work hard to make sure all students have access to digital learning opportunities and supervision. We work to get our students college and career ready, and digital learning helps us get there.

How Does OVCS Use Technology?

Lots of ways!


iPads are provided to older students for reading, writing, note-taking, accessing online resources, assignments, emailing with staff, and even capturing designs used to paint new murals in our hallways.


Storia.org is a digital library subscription that makes thousands of e-books available to students and their families. Thank you to the OVCS PTO for making this possible!


Learning management systems like Schoology and BrainHoney let teachers design lessons that are creative, rich with information, and delivered in ways that appeal to different kinds of learners.


Distance learning means our students can take classes in real-time in other schools, and students based in other schools can learn from OVCS faculty too. iPads work like smart boards with projectors (or blackboards, for those of us who remember those) so every student sees what the teacher is writing or drawing. Teleconferencing means students can see each other even if they are miles apart. This technology lets students in small schools like ours take classes that would not be otherwise available. They get free college credit for these advanced classes, too.


Blended (or "flipped") classrooms allow learners to watch or review their classroom lectures so classroom time with teachers and classmates can be spent more actively. Class time becomes available for projects, in depth discussion with teachers, and homework help. Lessons soak in when students have a chance to apply what they learn and to work on problem solving, and frustration declines when they get the help they need, when they need it.


Master scheduling has been enhanced by the flexibility that comes with blended classrooms. Students now take classes based on choice, not on limited class availability.


Teacher-made videos for some elementary classes equip parents to help with homework if they care to, or better understand new concepts.


Live streaming of some sporting events lets homebound and distant Vikings watch real-time games on their computers or electronic devices. When the winning point is scored, you're there! Students who run the live streaming learn videography too.


SchoolMessenger connects families and community members to the school calendar, updates, and late-breaking news like emergency closings. This email and phone resource also allows teachers to leave messages with parents as needed.


Digital communication tools mean OVCS can use the website (www.ovcs.org) and social media like Facebook and Twitter to stay in touch with Vikings past, present (and future). We have a lot to share!