Tin

Olyvia Wenzel, 8th, TIn

Periodic table information

Tin's symbol is Sn, atomic number 50, main group metal and is in group 14.

Where Tin is from

Tin is found mainly in the ore cassiterite, which is found in Malaysia, Bolivia, Indonesia, Thailand andNigeria. It is obtained commercially by reducing the ore with coal in a reverberatory furnace.

Uses

USES:

Tin has many uses. Electro-plating is an important application of tin. It can be done through the electroplating of a small coat of tin around objects of steel, copper, aluminum etc. The tinned pieces have countless applications such as in kitchen utensils, spray recipients and shaving foam, ink cans, electronic components, integrated circuits, clips, pins and many other. Tinned objects can also be used with ornamental purposes. As a pure metal,. It can still be used in storage tanks for pharmaceutical chemical solutions, in capacitors electrodes, fuse-wires, ammunitions, tinned iron sheets to protect victuals, sweets or tobacco etc. Some of the tin organic compounds have several application as fungicides and insecticides for the agriculture and still as wood, textile and paper preservers.

Discovery


Tin has been known since ancient times. We do not know who discovered it.




Physical properties

The most common allotrope of tin is a silver-white metallic-looking solid known as the β-form (or "beta-form"). Allotropes are forms of an element with different physical and chemical properties. This "white tin" has a melting point of 232°C (450°F), a boiling point of 2,260°C (4,100°F), and a density of 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter.

Chemical properties

Tin is relatively unaffected by both water and oxygen at room temperatures. It does not rust, corrode, or react in any other way. This explains one of its major uses: as a coating to protect other metals. At higher temperatures, however, the metal reacts with both water (as steam) and oxygen to form tin oxide.

Similarly, tin is attacked only slowly by dilute acids such as hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ). Dilute acids are mixtures that contain small amounts of acid dissolved in large amounts of water. This property also makes tin a good protective covering. It does not react with acids as rapidly as do many other kinds of metals, such as iron, and can be used, therefore, as a covering for those metals.

MLA Citing

The source gave us:

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  • Website Title: Tin
  • Article Title: Tin
  • Date Accessed: December 16, 2014

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The source gave us:

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  • Website Title: Chemicool
  • Article Title: Tin Element Facts
  • Date Accessed: December 16, 2014

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  • The source gave us:

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    • Website Title: Tin, Chemical Element
    • Article Title: Chemistry Explained
    • Date Accessed: December 16, 2014

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