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In My Dreams

In My Dreams

Staff Writer

Temarest Spencer

I always wondered about dream catchers so I did resea4rch on them and I learned that Native Americans, dreams that humans have while they sleep, are sent by sacred spirits as messages. According to their Legend, in the center of the Dream Catcher there is a hole. Good dreams are permitted to reach the sleeper through this hole in the web. As for the bad dreams, the web traps them and they disappear at dawn with the first light. For some, they try to determine what messages are being past onto them and what the message represents. The Dream Catcher represents several meanings. All of the decorations and materials used to decorate them, all have a special meaning. A single bead in the middle may represent the spider that is on the web. Scattered beads throughout the web may represent good dreams that may have been caught throughout the night. A feather represents a symbol of breath or air which is attached so it hangs from the center of the ring. It is essential for life. A baby watching the air playing with the feather on her cradleboard was entertained while also being given a lesson on the importance of good air. This lesson comes forward in the way that the feather of the Owl is kept for wisdom a woman's feather and the Eagle feather is kept for courage a man's feather. This is not to say that the use of each is restricted by gender; but that to use the feather each is aware of the gender properties she/he is invoking. Indian people, in general, are very specific about gender roles and identity.

Missing Brains

Missing Brains

Staff Writer

Temarest Spencer


About 100 brains, including one believed to be that of clock tower sniper Charles Whitman, are missing from a collection at the The University of Texas at Austin. It remains unclear who took the brains that were preserved in jars of formaldehyde and whether this was a harmless prank or theft. “We think somebody may have taken the brains, but we don't know at all for sure," psychology Professor Tim Schaller said. The University said in a statement that it will investigate "the circumstances surrounding this collection since it came here nearly 30 years ago" and that it's "committed to treating the brain specimens with respect." It says the remaining brain specimens on campus are used "as a teaching tool and carefully curated by faculty." Hannaford and photographer Adam Voorhees have been researching the origin of the brain collection and what the brains might tell us about the patients from whom they were taken in autopsies and have published a book called “Malformed: Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospital.” The university only had lab room for some 200 of the specimens. The others were stored in the basement of the university’s Animal Resources Center, the AP said. “They are no longer in the basement,” said Cormack to the AP.

OCS Funraiser

The OCS Fundraiser

Staff Writer

Temarest Spencer

Mrs. Bennett’s is one of the many people involved in OCS. The OCS is occupation course study is a class for students who don’t want to a four year college. This class helps students get good paying jobs before they graduate. This class starts from ninth grade to your senior year. This program has raised about six hundred dollars off just fundraising. They raise money to help with field trips, buying supplies, and whatever the class needs. Some events they have done in the past are the coffee shop events and selling chicken and waffles. On December 5th 2014, OCS was selling chicken and waffles for six dollars. The staff picks exactly what OCS will make that day; and most of the time they listen. There are fourteen students and four adults involved in OCS. This class also helps students with skills and tools they will need in a job; also some basic life skills. Mrs. Bennett has been involved in this program for four years, while the whole program has been around for twenty years. Some places they have gotten to go to are, UNCG, community to have lunch, Salvation Army, field trips, and more! When asked what is their motivation for this program Mrs. Bennett’s reply was; “We teach, were teaching and doing what we loved, giving to students something to remember.”