Lyme Disease

By: Erica Heisdorffer

Introduction

Lyme Disease is most common tick-borne illness, in North America and Europe. The type of tick is a deer tick. The deer tick feeds on blood. In the early stage/ when you get it and treat it right and go to the doctors right away, it will recover completely. In the later stage/ when you get it and don't treat it right away, it will take slower to recover.

Cause

The cause is when a deer tick bites you. The bite carries bacterium in it. The bacterium goes down the bloodstream. The tick has to be attached to you for at least 36 to 48 hours. If it isn't it attached that long it doesn't mean you don't have it still could get lyme disease.

Transmitted

A deer tick bites you, and send bacterium down the blood stream. If untreated for a while the bacterium will spread. When it spreads the bacterium travels to your nervous systems, and you joints.

Symptoms

In early stage you will get:
  • Rash
  • Flu like symptoms
In later stage you will get:
  • Joint pain
  • Neurological
  • Heart problems
  • Eye inflammation
  • Sever fatigue
  • Headache
  • Meningitis
  • Bell's palasy

How to treat it

You will want to treat the disease with oral antibiotics. That treatment is for the people who have the early stage of lyme disease. There is also another one called intravenous antibiotics, this one helps with the nervous system.

Will lyme disease always stay if you get it?

No the lyme disease won't always stay. Only if the medicine recovers completely. Only 10%-20% of the patients get the symptoms. If the medicine doesn't recover completely the you will have and chance of getting it again.

Similar diseases

  • Anaplasmosis
  • Barbesiosis
  • Colorado Tick Fever
  • Tularemia
  • Powassan Disease
  • Heartland Virus

Bites from ticks

If you ever see a tick on you it doesn't always mean that you got lyme disease. It depends on the type of tick, has to be a deer tick. Also the tick needs to be attached for at least 36 to 48 hours to get lyme disease.

How to remove a tick

You would need to get a pair of tweezers, grasp the mouthpiece. You wanna make sure you getting close as possible to the skin. Also you wanna make sure you don't squeeze the deer tick because it could have infectious fluids.

Appearance

Sometimes appearance is hard because some ticks look a like. The female tick is the biggest deer tick. The male is the next biggest one. A nymph is the second smallest one. The smallest one is called a larva.

Cases

The cases that were reported in the United States is 27,203 cases of lyme disease. Iowa got 153 reports out of 27,203.

Statistics

In 1995 there was 11,700 cases reported. In 2009 a high of 29,959 cases were reported. The most common age to get the disease is age 9. It's reported in nearly every state in the United States.

Where it's most commonly found

It's found in the United States in northeast part in the U.S. Also in north central states, and west states.

When and where did it start

Lyme disease started in 1975. The first report reported in the United States came from Old Lyme, Connecticut.

Prevention!

Preventing is a big thing with diseases, because who would want any disease. If you don't wan't to get lyme disease then, don't spend time in wooded or grassy areas. Don't have exposed skin if you go in wooded or grassy areas. You have to remove your tick promptly. Walk in the center of trails.

Preventing ticks in your yard!

Mow your yard frequently and rake leaves when needed. Keep your outdoor stuff away from tree areas. Remove any trash or old chairs where ticks would like to hide in.

How to protect your pets from lyme disease!

Check your pets daily. If you do find a tick remove it right away. Reduce tick habitat around your pets. Ask your vet about tick-borne diseases.

Bibliography

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