Sojourner Truth

The woman who stood up for hers and others rights.

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner truth was an abolitionist and feminist. To achieve her goals, abolish slavery and give women rights, she hold speeches to spread her ideas through the population. Her speeches and movements led slowly, with the help of the people she influenced with her ideas, to abolishing slavery and giving more rights to women.

Sojourner Truth's life.

Sojourner truth was born as a slave and was mistreated during all of her childhood life. During her years as slave she married and had around 5 children. She was then separated from her children and husband, but was left with one of her child. After the New York law of 1827-1828 her son was sold as a slave illegally but, with the help of some quakers, she sued in court her child's slave owners. After her victory in court she got her child back and started her life as abolitionist and feminist.


Sitography: http://womenshistory.about.com/od/sojournertruth/a/sojourner_truth_bio.htm

The start of Sojourner Truth reform ideas.

Isaac Van Wagener set Sojourner Truth free after that the NY state abolished slavery in 1827 and that she had found protection with him. After this she was introduced to abolitionism at a utopian community in Northampton.When she became familiar with these ideas she became abolitionist and attached to the women rights movements. She was one of the best-known American abolitionists of her day and she was the first black woman orator to speak out against slavery. She traveled widely through New England and the Midwest on speaking tours and one of her most famous speeches was "Ain't I A Women". Her early speeches were based on the belief that people show love for God by love and concern for others, but then began directing her speeches toward the abolition of slavery.In 1864, she visited President Abraham Lincoln in the White House and then stayed in Washington, D.C., and worked to improve living conditions for blacks.


Sitography: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/607415/Sojourner-Truth

Primary Source #1

A: Sojourner Truth. She was an abolitionist and feminist. She thinks that slavery should be abolished and that women should have more respect and should be treated the same as men.

P: December, 1851. Akron, Ohio.

P: I already know that she wanted to abolish slavery, that she fought for women's rights, and that she was a slave then freed with the New York law of 1827-1828.

A: It was created for the people, and this may affected the speech because she wrote it for the population that not all was educated so that she needed to use less advanced language.

R: It was created in that time because it was the time of slavery and the people were starting to think that slavery wasn’t right. She did this speech in those years even because it was less risky after the law that abolished slavery.

T: The source is trying to convince men, people in general, that women have the same capacities that men have.

S: This speech is one of the most famous of Sojourner Truth. This speech partly answers all of the topic questions: it says what she thought and wanted to reform, what she used to make this reform possible (speeches), and she stimulated the feminist movements and the abolitionist movements as well.


"Ain't I A Women"


Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.

If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.


Sitography: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/sojtruth-woman.asp

Primary Source #2

A: Sojourner Truth. She was an abolitionist and feminist. She thinks that slavery should be abolished and that women should have more respect and should be treated the same as men.

P:

P: I already know that she wanted to abolish slavery, that she fought for women's rights, and that she was a slave then freed with the New York law of 1827-1828.
A: It was created for everyone.
R: It was created in that time because it was the time of slavery and the people were starting to think that slavery wasn’t right. She did this speech in those years even because it was less risky after the law that abolished slavery.

T: The quote is trying to say that slave owners will not be forgiven for treating the slaves in that way.
S: This source is important because it says to the slave owners that they are sinners which is not normal to say for a black person to a white person.


Quote: "Religion without humanity is very poor human stuff" Sojourner Truth


Sitography: http://www.africanamericanquotes.org/sojourner-truth.html

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Multiple Choice Questions

1) Where was Sojourner Truth introduced to abolitionism?

a. In a community at Northampton.

b. In a community in New York.

c. During her slaves year by other black slaves.

2) What was the main way Sojourner Truth used to spread her revolutionary ideas.

a. By battles and by using force.

b. By holding speeches.

c. By organized criminalization.