KAMIKAZE: The Last Resort

When Kamikaze Attacked, It was Japan's Last Resort

Summary of Event

The Kamikaze were pilots that would crash into allied ships in the Pacific Campaign in order to slow the advance of Allied forces. 30 Japanese pilots flew into the Leyte Gulf on October 25, 1944. The Kamikaze killed 12,520 Americans, but lost 7,465 of their own pilots in the process. The battle of the Leyte Gulf was won by the American forces. The Kamikaze did not effect the war that much, but showed American sailors just how determined Japanese pilots were as they defended their homeland. The Kamikaze were Japan's last resort at holding off Allied advance in the Pacific Campaign..
Kamikaze Attack on US Ships in WWII / Атака камикадзе на ВМС США

DETAILED EXPLANATION

Kamikaze's were bombers that would crash into allied ships to slow down the invasion, the allies were bringing on Japan. Before the battle actually began kamikazes had to be trained because most of them were volunteers. The training was extremely intense.


Finally the day came, the Kamikazes took action. The Kamikaze flew into battle into the Leyte Gulf on October, 25 1944. Only 19% of Kamikazes actually hit their target. It was blood shed as Kamikaze bombed ship, after ship, after ship. Some Kamikaze had engine trouble and didn't even make it to the battle, or they took the bomb out of their plane so they had to go get a new bomb.

After the entire battle was over the Kamikaze did not effect the battle or the war that much. The aftermath was horrifying. The allies lost 120 ships, along with 12,520 soldiers. There was 7,465 Kamikaze deaths. Most Kamikazes did not hit their targets but still died. This did not prevent the invasion of the Leyte Gulf or Japan. To conclude, the Kamikaze did not have a big factor in World War 2.

FIRST HAND ACCOUNT

"Memorizing and reciting the Imperial Rescript to Soldiers (Gunjin Chokuyu) of 1882, written in archaic language, were a daily exercise. If we failed in the accurate recitation of the Rescript, we were hit to the ground, as I experienced personally. It would be hard to estimate how many soldiers in fact became alienated from the emperor and imperial ideology by “lynching.”" -Anonymous

FACTS AND STATISTICS

  • 120 U.S. ships where sunk and 12,520 U.S. soldiers died.
  • Kamikaze took place in Leyte Gulf on October 25, 1944.
  • Only 19% of Kamikazes actually hit there target.
  • Many Kamikazes motivation was inspired by the samurai spirit.
  • Some pilots thought that there families would get hurt and they would be shameful to there country if they didn't volunteer.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"A Kamikaze Who Lived to Tell the Tale." History Net Where History Comes Alive World US History Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2016. <http://www.historynet.com/a-kamikaze-who-lived-to-tell-the-tale.htm>.



"First Kamikaze Attack of the War Begins." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2016. <http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-kamikaze-attack-of-the-war-begins>.




McCurry, Justin. "The Last Kamikaze: Two Japanese Pilots Tell How They Cheated Death." The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 11 Aug. 2015. Web. 09 Feb. 2016. <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/11/the-last-kamikaze-two-japanese-pilots-tell-how-they-cheated-death>.



"Suicide Tactics: The Kamikaze During World War II - Air Group 4." Suicide Tactics: The Kamikaze During World War II - Air Group 4. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2016. <http://www.airgroup4.com/kamikaze.htm>.


"First Kamikaze Attack of the War Begins." History.com. A&E Television
Networks, n.d. Web. 01 Feb. 2016.