Ancient Roman FAQs

Nona Glasper

Writing

Romans didn't have paper so they used to papyrus as paper. To make papyrus they used the papyrus plant they cut the plant stalks, thne layered them in crisscross patterns on top of each other, let dry then used. As a writing utensil they primarily used a quill dipped in ink. Documents pictures and records made using papyrus and the quill dipped in ink have lasted for thousands of years. Lower class people or people with not much money to buy the expensive papyrus often used cave wall and stones to engraved important things in however literacy was definitely everywhere in Ancient Rome.

Family

Ancient Roman families were much different than our families today. A typical Roman family would be in our eyes "extended" . Their extended families consisted of aunts, uncles, grandfathers, grandmothers, cousins, and slaves. The oldest male in the house was considered to be in charge power in the household was not distributed at all. In these Roman families if you were to do something very wrong to upset your father or elder you could be killed. The women is the family often had to clean and cook mothers were meant to guide their children and make sure they grew up correctly and a "good Roman" . Fathers were also very different they arranged marriages for their children few children decided who they wanted to marry, girls commonly married at very young ages and many died trying to give birth at these young ages. The names of females and males in Ancient Rome often denoted their social status. They had praenomens,nomens and cognomens. Females usually had praenomens and nomens, their parenomens ended with -ia. Male praenomens ended with -ius however they had 3 names. Slaves had one name.

Clothing - Men and Boys

When formally dressed the clothing of a male or female of Rome indicated status and citizenship in the Roman world. The toga is a highly symbolic garment for the Romans. Men and boys wore an undergarment named perizoma. Men wore a loose robe over a chiton. A chiton is a large rectangle of material folded together along the edge of opposite ends to created a tube. Elderly men often wore much longer chitons. Propriety demanded men only wear rings as jewelry. Boys sometimes wore small gold rings.

Clothing - Women and Girls

Women and girls hair was usually pulled back combed nicely and then braided and tied with a wool cloth that signified purity. Girls wore a toga praetexta which had a purpple border when these young girls began puberty they no longer wore the toga praetexta. Roman brides changed their hair color soon before they got married to a yellowish-orange color and also changed their toga praetexta to a tunica recta. Once a woman was married she wore a stola which is a dress with shoulder straps.

Citations

Lawall, Gilbert, Timothy S. Abney, David J. Perry, and Ronald B. Palma. Ecce Romani: A Latin Reading Program. Boston, MA: Pearson, 2009. Print.

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015

Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

"Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.