Tangerines

by: Jahsuan Robinson

Tangerine Sherbert Recipe

Ingredients







Directions

  1. Step 1

    Place tangerine zest in medium bowl. Heat 1/2 cup tangerine juice, the sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until sugar dissolves. Transfer syrup to bowl with zest. Stir in remaining 2 1/2 cups tangerine juice, the Grand Marnier, and cream. Refrigerate until chilled, about 30 minutes.

  2. Step 2

    Freeze mixture in an ice cream maker, following manufacturer's instructions. Transfer to a container, and freeze until firm, at least 4 hours.

Jasmine-Tea Tangerineade

Ingredients




  • 3 1/4 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons jasmine pearls
  • 1 1/4 cups Simple Syrup Simple Syrup
  • 3 cups fresh tangerine juice, strained (from 8 to 10 tangerines)



Directions

  1. Step 1

    Bring water to a simmer in a small saucepan. Remove from heat, add jasmine pearls, and infuse for 2 1/2 minutes. Strain through a small sieve into a pitcher. Discard pearls. Let cool.

  2. Step 2

    Add syrup and tangerine juice to pitcher. Divide tangerineade among ice-filled glasses. (Or cover, and refrigerate for up to 3 days.)


Belongs to the Citrus Family

Packs A Punch of Vitamin C (:

The Tangerine

The most important nutrients found in a tangerine are anti-oxidants.

Some common methods for cooking tangerines include

Dancy Tangerine is a variety of tangerine that has a thin rind.

Color is orange.

Historical Facts

The history of the tangerine is quite interesting. The tangerine is actually a variety of the Mandarin orange, which is native to southeastern Asia. The name "tangerine" originates from Tangier, Morocco which was the port from which the very first batch of the tangerine fruit were shipped from Tangier, Morocco or southeast Asia to Europe. Tangerines have been cultivated for over three thousand years in counties like Japan and China. However, this amazing fruit did not arrive in the US until the mid nineteenth century. The first batch of tangerines was brought to America when the Italian consul in New Orleans decided to plant it on the grounds surrounding the consulate. From New Orleans, the tangerine was taken to Florida and it became a commercial crop like other citrus fruits. Florida has become famous for their production of oranges as well as tangerines.

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Ricotta-Filled Crepes with Tangerine and Lemon Marmalade

Ingredients


  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 large eggs
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more for pan
  • 1 cup, fresh ricotta cheese
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 to 2 pint-size jars Tangerine and Lemon Marmalade, stirred or warmed slightly (2 to 4 cups)


Directions

  1. Step 1

    Whisk together flour, sugar, and salt. Whisk together milk, vanilla, and eggs. Gradually add milk mixture to flour mixture, whisking until smooth. Whisk in melted butter. Strain through a fine sieve; discard lumps. Refrigerate batter for at least 2 hours or overnight.

  2. Step 2

    Preheat oven to 200 degrees. Combine ricotta and zest. Lightly coat a 6-inch crepe pan or nonstick skillet with butter. Heat over medium heat until just starting to smoke. Remove from heat; pour 2 tablespoons batter into center. Swirl to cover bottom. Reduce heat to medium-low; return pan to heat. Cook until edges are golden and center is dry, about 45 seconds. Flip; cook for 45 seconds.

  3. Step 3

    Slide crepe onto an ovenproof plate; cover with foil, and transfer to oven. Repeat with remaining batter, coating pan with butter as needed.

  4. Step 4

    Fill each crepe with 2 to 3 tablespoons ricotta mixture. Fold into quarters to form a triangle. Make stacks of 3 crepes. Top with marmalade.

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