Japanese Internment

What Propoganda Didn't Show You

Families Leave for Camps

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This picture is showing a family on the train heading out to the internment camps. In it, the family looks really happy; almost like they are excited to be going away. The government probably showed this picture in newspapers or on T.V. to show the rest of the country that what they were doing was benefiting both groups of people; Japanese-Americans and the rest of the nation.
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As seen in this photo, everyone is waiting to load onto the train and the families are lined up next to the train while soldiers, carrying guns, stand facing them. Most of the Japanese-American people look scared and defensive according to their body position and expressions on their faces. This picture is very different from the one above since it shows the seriousness and intensity of the situation meanwhile the other picture shows happiness and even a little pride for the country. I highly doubt that this picture would've been shown in many places during wartime because it might have sparked some suspicion as to what was really happening within the people with good moral values.
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This picture displays a few children living in the internment camps who are probably studying in class. The students don't have a particularly specific emotion shown on their face; they are simply content. In fact, they don't look miserable at all. In the next picture, however, it will be seen that the citizens show quite a difference in emotion away from the cameras.
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This image is pretty scary since the internees are shown as being trapped behind a fence as they are trying to escape. They are being forbidden their freedom, one of the rights of humanity. Considering that this is how they were kept for three years, it is very scary to think that americans treated other americans this way and somehow got away with it by showing