The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Ashley Castellanos and Autumn Crisafulli

Theme

Society wrongfully designates scapegoats to bear the sins of the community.

Thesis

In the riveting short story, "The Lottery", written by Shirley Jackson, suggests that society wrongfully designates scapegoats to bear the sins in the community.

Three Mini Summaries.

Tessie, winner of the lottery, was lighthearted, when she was unaware of the time coming.

"Wouldn't have leave m'dishes in the sink, now, would you Joe?,' & soft laughter ran through the crowd as the people stirred back into position after Mrs. Hutchinson's arrival." (Jackson 2)

Once Tessie was conscious of her fate, she began to defend herself, and tried to get out of the situation she was in.

"It wasn't fair." (Jackson 4) "I think we ought to start over." (Jackson 4)

The city folk from the village believed that it was tradition to continue "The Lottery" and if you won you are to accept the fate you are given.

"Its not the way it used to be, old man Warner said clearly. People aint the way they used to be." (Jackson 5)

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In Summary

In the riveting short story, "The Lottery", written by Shirley Jackson, suggests that society wrongfully designates scapegoats to bear the sins in the community. The readers take away how cultures/traditions can define who you are as a person; how you change when in an unbearable situation.